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@article{Kisielowski2016,
  author = {Christian Kisielowski},
  title = {On the pressing need to address beam–sample interactions in atomic resolution electron microscopy},
  year = {2016},
  volume = {51},
  pages = {635-639},
  issn = {0022-2461},
  __markedentry = {[zach:]},
  doi = {10.1007/s10853-015-9545-4},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2017.11.21}
}
@incollection{Tanigaki2016b,
  author = {T. Tanigaki and T. Akashi and Y. Takahashi and T. Kawasaki and H. Shinada},
  title = {Chapter Three - Quest for Ultimate Resolution Using Coherent Electron Waves: An Aberration-Corrected High-Voltage Electron Microscope},
  publisher = {Elsevier},
  year = {2016},
  editor = {Peter W. Hawkes},
  volume = {198},
  number = {Supplement C},
  series = {Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics},
  pages = {69 - 125},
  __markedentry = {[zach:6]},
  abstract = {Abstract Advances in high-resolution electron microscopy were reviewed in this chapter, including a description of an innovation of the electron microscope, early efforts in lattice fringe imaging, developments of a cold field emission (cold-FE) electron source, high-voltage electron microscopy, realization and progress of the aberration corrector, and an aberration-corrected, 1.2-MV, high-voltage transmission electron microscope (TEM). The last one was developed through the FIRST Tonomura Program. Its point resolution was 43pm in TEM imaging mode. It also has a magnetic-field-free sample position, and a point resolution of 0.24nm was obtained at that position. These capabilities offer researchers a new way to observe magnetic fields at atomic scale, which has become particularly important for the development of technologies for controlling electrons by utilizing their spins.},
  doi = {https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.aiep.2016.08.004},
  issn = {1076-5670},
  keywords = {Coherent electron wave, High-resolution electron microscopy, High-voltage electron microscopy, Aberration correction, Field emission, Electron holography},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2017.11.21},
  url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1076567016300891}
}
@article{Jin2017,
  author = {Jin, Lei and Barthel, Juri and Jia, Chun-Lin and Urban, Knut W},
  title = {Atomic resolution imaging of YAlO 3: Ce in the chromatic and spherical aberration corrected PICO electron microscope},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2017},
  volume = {176},
  pages = {99--104},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2016.12.026},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {Elsevier},
  timestamp = {2017.06.21}
}
@article{Urban2013a,
  author = {Urban, K W and Mayer, J and Jinschek, J R and Neish, M J and Lugg, N R and Allen, L J},
  title = {Achromatic elemental mapping beyond the nanoscale in the transmission electron microscope.},
  journal = {Physical review letters},
  year = {2013},
  volume = {110},
  pages = {185507},
  month = may,
  issn = {1079-7114},
  abstract = {Newly developed achromatic electron optics allows the use of wide energy windows and makes feasible energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) at atomic resolution. In this Letter we present EFTEM images formed using electrons that have undergone a silicon L(2,3) core-shell energy loss, exhibiting a resolution in EFTEM of 1.35 Å. This permits elemental mapping beyond the nanoscale provided that quantum mechanical calculations from first principles are done in tandem with the experiment to understand the physical information encoded in the images.},
  chemicals = {Silicon},
  citation-subset = {IM},
  completed = {2013-07-12},
  country = {United States},
  created = {2013-05-20},
  doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.185507},
  issn-linking = {0031-9007},
  issue = {18},
  keywords = {Electrons; Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, methods; Models, Chemical; Nanotechnology, methods; Optics and Photonics, methods; Quantum Theory; Silicon, chemistry; Thermodynamics},
  nlm-id = {0401141},
  owner = {NLM},
  pmid = {23683220},
  pubmodel = {Print-Electronic},
  pubstatus = {ppublish},
  revised = {2013-11-21},
  timestamp = {2017.06.21}
}
@article{Uhlemann2013,
  author = {Uhlemann, Stephan and M{\"u}ller, Heiko and Hartel, Peter and Zach, Joachim and Haider, Max},
  title = {Thermal magnetic field noise limits resolution in transmission electron microscopy},
  journal = {Physical review letters},
  year = {2013},
  volume = {111},
  number = {4},
  pages = {046101},
  doi = {10.1103/physrevlett.111.046101},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {APS},
  timestamp = {2017.05.03}
}
@article{Ishikawa2016,
  title = {Single atom visibility in STEM optical depth sectioning},
  author = {Ishikawa, Ryo and Pennycook, Stephen J. and Lupini, Andrew R. and Findlay, Scott D. and Shibata, Naoya and Ikuhara, Yuichi},
  journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
  year = {2016},
  month = {Oct},
  number = {16},
  pages = {163102},
  volume = {109},
  doi = {10.1063/1.4965709},
  issn = {1077-3118},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {AIP Publishing},
  timestamp = {2017.01.19},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4965709}
}
@article{Krause2016,
  author = {Krause, Florian F. and Schowalter, Marco and Grieb, Tim and Müller-Caspary, Knut and Mehrtens, Thorsten and Rosenauer, Andreas},
  title = {Effects of instrument imperfections on quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2016},
  volume = {161},
  pages = {146–160},
  month = {Feb},
  issn = {0304-3991},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2015.10.026},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {Elsevier BV},
  timestamp = {2017.01.19},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2015.10.026}
}
@article{Linck2016,
  author = {Linck, Martin and Hartel, Peter and Uhlemann, Stephan and Kahl, Frank and Müller, Heiko and Zach, Joachim and Haider, Max. and Niestadt, Marcel and Bischoff, Maarten and Biskupek, Johannes and et al.},
  title = {Chromatic Aberration Correction for Atomic Resolution TEM Imaging from 20 to 80 kV},
  journal = {Physical Review Letters},
  year = {2016},
  volume = {117},
  number = {7},
  month = {Aug},
  issn = {1079-7114},
  doi = {10.1103/physrevlett.117.076101},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {American Physical Society (APS)},
  timestamp = {2017.01.19},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.076101}
}
@article{Yankovich2014,
  title = {Thickness Variations and Absence of Lateral Compositional Fluctuations in Aberration-Corrected STEM Images of {InGaN} {LED} Active Regions at Low Dose},
  author = {Yankovich, Andrew B. and Kvit, Alexander V. and Li, Xing and Zhang, Fan and Avrutin, Vitaliy and Liu, Huiyong and Izyumskaya, Natalia and Özgür, Ümit and Van Leer, Brandon and Morkoç, Hadis and et al.},
  journal = {Microsc Microanal},
  year = {2014},
  month = {Mar},
  number = {03},
  pages = {864–868},
  volume = {20},
  doi = {10.1017/s1431927614000427},
  issn = {1435-8115},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
  timestamp = {2016.06.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1431927614000427}
}
@article{Zhu2013,
  title = {Cs-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigation of Dislocation Core Configurations at a SrTiO3/MgO Heterogeneous Interface},
  author = {Zhu, Yuanyuan and Song, Chengyu and Minor, Andrew M. and Wang, Haiyan},
  journal = {Microsc Microanal},
  year = {2013},
  month = {May},
  number = {03},
  pages = {706–715},
  volume = {19},
  doi = {10.1017/s1431927613000408},
  issn = {1435-8115},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
  timestamp = {2016.06.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1431927613000408}
}
@article{Forbes2014,
  title = {Elemental mapping in achromatic atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy.},
  author = {Forbes, B. D. and Houben, L. and Mayer, J. and Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. and Allen, L. J.},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2014},
  month = {Dec},
  pages = {98--105},
  volume = {147},
  abstract = {We present atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images obtained with the chromatic-aberration-corrected FEI Titan PICO at the Ernst-Ruska Centre, Jülich, Germany. We find qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation for the background-subtracted EFTEM images of the Ti-L2,3 and O-K edges for a specimen of SrTiO3 oriented down the [110] zone axis. The simulations utilize the transition potential formulation for inelastic scattering, which permits a detailed investigation of contributions to the EFTEM image. We find that energy-filtered images of the Ti-L2,3 and O-K edges are lattice images and that the background-subtracted core-loss maps may not be directly interpretable as elemental maps. Simulations show that this is a result of preservation of elastic contrast, whereby the qualitative details of the image are determined primarily by elastic, coherent scattering. We show that this effect places a constraint on the range of specimen thicknesses which could theoretically yield directly useful elemental maps. In general, interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.07.002},
  institution = {School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia. Electronic address: lja@unimelb.edu.au.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(14)00125-9},
  pmid = {25064541},
  timestamp = {2016.03.16},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.07.002}
}
@article{McVitie2015,
  title = {Aberration corrected Lorentz scanning transmission electron microscopy.},
  author = {McVitie, S. and McGrouther, D. and McFadzean, S. and MacLaren, D. A. and O'Shea, K. J. and Benitez, M. J.},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2015},
  month = {May},
  pages = {57--62},
  volume = {152},
  abstract = {We present results from an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope which has been customised for high resolution quantitative Lorentz microscopy with the sample located in a magnetic field free or low field environment. We discuss the innovations in microscope instrumentation and additional hardware that underpin the imaging improvements in resolution and detection with a focus on developments in differential phase contrast microscopy. Examples from materials possessing nanometre scale variations in magnetisation illustrate the potential for aberration corrected Lorentz imaging as a tool to further our understanding of magnetism on this lengthscale.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2015.01.003},
  institution = {Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(15)00012-1},
  pmid = {25677688},
  timestamp = {2016.03.16},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2015.01.003}
}
@article{Uhlemann2015,
  title = {Thermal magnetic field noise: electron optics and decoherence.},
  author = {Uhlemann, Stephan and M{\"{u}}ller, Heiko and Zach, Joachim and Haider, Max},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2015},
  month = {Apr},
  pages = {199--210},
  volume = {151},
  abstract = {Thermal magnetic field noise from magnetic and non-magnetic conductive parts close to the electron beam recently has been identified as a reason for decoherence in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Here, we report about new experimental results from measurements for a layered structure of magnetic and non-magnetic materials. For a simplified version of this setup and other situations we derive semi-analytical models in order to predict the strength, bandwidth and spatial correlation of the noise fields. The results of the simulations are finally compared to previous and new experimental data in a quantitative manner.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.11.022},
  institution = {CEOS Corrected Electron Optical Systems GmbH, Englerstraße28, 69126 Heidelberg, Germany.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(14)00238-1},
  pmid = {25499019},
  timestamp = {2016.03.16},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.11.022}
}
@article{Yoshida2015,
  title = {Critical conditions for atomic resolution imaging of molecular crystals by aberration-corrected HRTEM.},
  author = {Yoshida, Kaname and Biskupek, Johannes and Kurata, Hiroki and Kaiser, Ute},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2015},
  month = {Dec},
  pages = {73--80},
  volume = {159 Pt 1},
  abstract = {Atomically resolved imaging of organic molecules consisting of thin crystals by aberration-corrected (AC) HRTEM was studied by experimental observations and image simulations. An atomically resolved image of the hexadecachlorophthalocyanatocopper (CuPcCl16) molecule was obtained under low-dose conditions. The conditions for imaging organic frameworks were found to be more restricted than those for heavier elements such as copper and chlorine. For the characterization of the benzene rings within CuPcCl16 molecules, the specimen thickness had to be less than ~5nm. The effects of the defocus conditions were examined by changing the image according to the location of the inclined specimen. The optimal defocus range for atomic resolution imaging of organic molecules was limited to a narrow region around the Scherzer defocus. Compared with scanning transmission microscopy, AC-HRTEM is more suitable for low-dose imaging, but the optimum conditions were severely restricted.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2015.08.006},
  institution = {Electron Microscopy Group of Materials Science, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm, Germany.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(15)30021-8},
  pmid = {26334288},
  timestamp = {2016.03.16},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2015.08.006}
}
@article{Zaluzec2015,
  title = {The influence of Cs/Cc correction in analytical imaging and spectroscopy in scanning and transmission electron microscopy.},
  author = {Zaluzec, Nestor J.},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2015},
  month = {Apr},
  pages = {240--249},
  volume = {151},
  abstract = {Aberration correction in scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) owes much to the efforts of a small dedicated group of innovators. Leading that frontier has been Prof. Harald Rose. To date his leadership and dynamic personality has spearheaded our ability to leave behind many of the limitations imposed by spherical aberration (Cs) in high resolution phase contrast imaging. Following shortly behind, has been the development of chromatic aberration correction (Cc) which augments those accomplishments. In this paper we will review and summarize how the combination of Cs/Cc technology enhances our ability to conduct hyperspectral imaging and spectroscopy in today's and future computationally mediated experiments in both thin as well as realistic specimens in vacuo and during in-situ/environmental experiments.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.09.012},
  institution = {Electron Microscopy Center, Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, United States. Electronic address: zaluzec@microscopy.com.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(14)00192-2},
  pmid = {25498141},
  timestamp = {2016.03.16},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.09.012}
}
@article{Akashi2015,
  title = {Aberration corrected 1.2\mbox{-}{MV} cold field-emission transmission electron microscope with a sub-50\mbox{-}{pm} resolution},
  author = {Akashi, Tetsuya and Takahashi, Yoshio and Tanigaki, Toshiaki and Shimakura, Tomokazu and Kawasaki, Takeshi and Furutsu, Tadao and Shinada, Hiroyuki and Müller, Heiko and Haider, Maximilian and Osakabe, Nobuyuki and et al.},
  journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
  year = {2015},
  month = {Feb},
  number = {7},
  pages = {074101},
  volume = {106},
  doi = {10.1063/1.4908175},
  issn = {1077-3118},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {AIP Publishing},
  timestamp = {2016.03.02},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4908175}
}
@article{Bell2014,
  title = {Successful application of Low Voltage Electron Microscopy to practical materials problems.},
  author = {Bell, David C. and Mankin, Max and Day, Robert W. and Erdman, Natasha},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2014},
  month = {Oct},
  pages = {56--65},
  volume = {145},
  abstract = {Low-voltage High-Resolution Electron Microscopy (LVHREM) has several advantages, including increased cross-sections for inelastic and elastic scattering, increased contrast per electron, decreased delocalization effects and reduced knock-on damage. Imaging at differing voltages has shown advantages for imaging materials that are knock-on damage sensitive. We show experimentally that different materials systems benefit from low voltage high-resolution microscopy. There are advantages for imaging single layer materials such as graphene at below the knock-on threshold; we present an example of imaging a graphene sheet at 40kV. We have also examined mesoporous silica decorated with Pd nanoparticles and carbon black functionalized with Pd/Pt nanoparticles. In these cases we show that the lower voltage imaging maintains the structure of the surrounding matrix during imaging, whereas aberration correction provides the higher resolution for imaging the nanoparticle lattice. Perhaps surprisingly we show that zeolites damage preferentially by ionization effects (radiolysis). The current literature suggests that below incident energies of 40kV the damage is mainly radiolitic, whereas at incident energies above 200kV the knock-on damage and material sputtering will be the dominant effect. Our experimental observations support this conclusion and the effects we have observed at 40kV are not indicative of knock-on damage. Other nanoscale materials such as thin silicon nanowires also benefit from lower voltage imaging. LVHREM imaging provides an excellent option to avoid beam damage to nanowires; our results suggest that LVHREM is suitable for nanowire-biological composites. Our experimental observations serve as a clear demonstration that even at 40keV accelerating voltage, LVHREM can be used without inducing beam damage to locate dislocations and other crystalline defects, which may have adverse effects on nanowire device performance. Low voltage operation will likely become the new mode of imaging for many electron microscopes, with the instrument being, in essence, tuned to extract all the information possible from each electron that transits the sample.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.03.005},
  institution = {JEOL USA Inc. Peabody, MA, USA.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(14)00050-3},
  pmid = {24767093},
  timestamp = {2016.01.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.03.005}
}
@article{Boothroyd2014,
  title = {Atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy of barium atoms and functional groups on graphene oxide.},
  author = {Boothroyd, C. B. and Moreno, M. S. and Duchamp, M. and Kov{\'{a}}cs, A. and Monge, N. and Morales, G. M. and Barbero, C. A. and Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2014},
  month = {Oct},
  pages = {66--73},
  volume = {145},
  abstract = {We present an atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) study of the local structure and composition of graphene oxide modified with Ba(2+). In our experiments, which are carried out at 80kV, the acquisition of contamination-free high-resolution STEM images is only possible while heating the sample above 400°C using a highly stable heating holder. Ba atoms are identified spectroscopically in electron energy-loss spectrum images taken at 800°C and are associated with bright contrast in high-angle annular dark-field STEM images. The spectrum images also show that Ca and O occur together and that Ba is not associated with a significant concentration of O. The electron dose used for spectrum imaging results in beam damage to the specimen, even at elevated temperature. It is also possible to identify Ba atoms in high-resolution TEM images acquired using shorter exposure times at room temperature, thereby allowing the structure of graphene oxide to be studied using complementary TEM and STEM techniques over a wide range of temperatures.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.03.004},
  institution = {Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich, Germany.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(14)00049-7},
  pmid = {24726278},
  timestamp = {2016.01.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.03.004}
}
@article{Hovden2014,
  title = {Breaking the Crowther limit: combining depth-sectioning and tilt tomography for high-resolution, wide-field 3D reconstructions.},
  author = {Hovden, Robert and Ercius, Peter and Jiang, Yi and Wang, Deli and Yu, Yingchao and Abru{\~{n}}a, H{\'{e}}ctor D. and Elser, Veit and Muller, David A.},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2014},
  month = {May},
  pages = {26--31},
  volume = {140},
  abstract = {To date, high-resolution (<1 nm) imaging of extended objects in three-dimensions (3D) has not been possible. A restriction known as the Crowther criterion forces a tradeoff between object size and resolution for 3D reconstructions by tomography. Further, the sub-Angstrom resolution of aberration-corrected electron microscopes is accompanied by a greatly diminished depth of field, causing regions of larger specimens (>6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over 100 dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.01.013},
  institution = { Engineering Physics and Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(14)00023-0},
  pmid = {24636875},
  timestamp = {2016.01.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.01.013}
}
@article{Lee2014,
  title = {Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images.},
  author = {Lee, Z. and Rose, H. and Lehtinen, O. and Biskupek, J. and Kaiser, U.},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2014},
  month = {Oct},
  pages = {3--12},
  volume = {145},
  abstract = {In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.01.010},
  institution = {Universität Ulm, Materialwissenschaftliche Elektronenmikroskopie, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm, Germany.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(14)00020-5},
  pmid = {24566042},
  timestamp = {2016.01.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.01.010}
}
@article{Du2015,
  title = {Atomic structure and chemistry of dislocation cores at low-angle tilt grain boundary in SrTiO3~{b}icrystals},
  author = {Du, Hongchu and Jia, Chun-Lin and Houben, Lothar and Metlenko, Veronika and De Souza, Roger A. and Waser, Rainer and Mayer, Joachim},
  journal = {Acta Materialia},
  year = {2015},
  month = {May},
  pages = {344–351},
  volume = {89},
  doi = {10.1016/j.actamat.2015.02.016},
  issn = {1359-6454},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {Elsevier BV},
  timestamp = {2015.11.20},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actamat.2015.02.016}
}
@article{Du2015a,
  title = { Atomic Structure of Antiphase Nanodomains in Fe-Doped SrTiO 3~{F}ilms },
  author = {Du, Hongchu and Jia, Chun-Lin and Mayer, Joachim and Barthel, Juri and Lenser, Christian and Dittmann, Regina},
  journal = {Advanced Functional Materials},
  year = {2015},
  month = {May},
  pages = {n/a–n/a},
  doi = {10.1002/adfm.201500852},
  issn = {1616-301X},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  timestamp = {2015.11.20},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201500852}
}
@article{Jia2014,
  title = {Determination of the 3D shape of a nanoscale crystal with atomic resolution from a single image.},
  author = {Jia, C. L. and Mi, S. B. and Barthel, J. and Wang, D. W. and Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. and Urban, K. W. and Thust, A.},
  journal = {Nat Mater},
  year = {2014},
  month = {Nov},
  number = {11},
  pages = {1044--1049},
  volume = {13},
  abstract = {Although the overall atomic structure of a nanoscale crystal is in principle accessible by modern transmission electron microscopy, the precise determination of its surface structure is an intricate problem. Here, we show that aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy, combined with dedicated numerical evaluation procedures, allows the three-dimensional shape of a thin MgO crystal to be determined from only one single high-resolution image. The sensitivity of the reconstruction procedure is not only sufficient to reveal the surface morphology of the crystal with atomic resolution, but also to detect the presence of adsorbed impurity atoms. The single-image approach that we introduce offers important advantages for three-dimensional studies of radiation-sensitive crystals.},
  doi = {10.1038/nmat4087},
  institution = { Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {nmat4087},
  pmid = {25242534},
  timestamp = {2015.11.20},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmat4087}
}
@article{Jia2015,
  title = {Nanodomains and nanometer-scale disorder in multiferroic bismuth ferrite single crystals},
  author = {Jia, Chun-Lin and Jin, Lei and Wang, Dawei and Mi, Shao-Bo and Alexe, Marin and Hesse, Dietrich and Reichlova, Helena and Marti, Xavi and Bellaiche, Laurent and Urban, Knut W.},
  journal = {Acta Materialia},
  year = {2015},
  month = {Jan},
  pages = {356–368},
  volume = {82},
  doi = {10.1016/j.actamat.2014.09.003},
  issn = {1359-6454},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {Elsevier BV},
  timestamp = {2015.11.20},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actamat.2014.09.003}
}
@article{Mangel2014,
  title = {Atomic-Scale Evolution of a Growing Core–Shell Nanoparticle},
  author = {Mangel, Shai and Aronovitch, Eran and Enyashin, Andrey N. and Houben, Lothar and Bar-Sadan, Maya},
  journal = {Journal of the American Chemical Society},
  year = {2014},
  month = {Sep},
  number = {36},
  pages = {12564–12567},
  volume = {136},
  doi = {10.1021/ja506323s},
  issn = {1520-5126},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {American Chemical Society (ACS)},
  timestamp = {2015.11.20},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja506323s}
}
@article{Wei2014,
  title = {Ferroelectric translational antiphase boundaries in nonpolar materials.},
  author = {Wei, Xian-Kui and Tagantsev, Alexander K. and Kvasov, Alexander and Roleder, Krystian and Jia, Chun-Lin and Setter, Nava},
  journal = {Nat Commun},
  year = {2014},
  pages = {3031},
  volume = {5},
  abstract = {Ferroelectric materials are heavily used in electro-mechanics and electronics. Inside the ferroelectric, domain walls separate regions in which the spontaneous polarization is differently oriented. Properties of ferroelectric domain walls can differ from those of the domains themselves, leading to new exploitable phenomena. Even more exciting is that a non-ferroelectric material may have domain boundaries that are ferroelectric. Many materials possess translational antiphase boundaries. Such boundaries could be interesting entities to carry information if they were ferroelectric. Here we show first that antiphase boundaries in antiferroelectrics may possess ferroelectricity. We then identify these boundaries in the classical antiferroelectric lead zirconate and evidence their polarity by electron microscopy using negative spherical-aberration imaging technique. Ab initio modelling confirms the polar bi-stable nature of the walls. Ferroelectric antiphase boundaries could make high-density non-volatile memory; in comparison with the magnetic domain wall memory, they do not require current for operation and are an order of magnitude thinner.},
  doi = {10.1038/ncomms4031},
  institution = {Ceramics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne CH-1015, Switzerland.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {ncomms4031},
  pmid = {24398704},
  timestamp = {2015.11.20},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms4031}
}
@article{Sun2012,
  title = {Ambient-stable tetragonal phase in silver nanostructures},
  author = {Sun, Yugang and Ren, Yang and Liu, Yuzi and Wen, Jianguo and Okasinski, John S. and Miller, Dean J.},
  journal = {Nature Communications},
  year = {2012},
  month = {Jul},
  pages = {971},
  volume = {3},
  doi = {10.1038/ncomms1963},
  issn = {2041-1723},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {Nature Publishing Group},
  timestamp = {2015.05.20},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1963}
}
@article{Clark2013,
  title = {Exploiting lens aberrations to create electron-vortex beams.},
  author = {Clark, L. and Béché, A. and Guzzinati, G. and Lubk, A. and Mazilu, M. and {Van Boxem}, R. and Verbeeck, J.},
  journal = {Phys Rev Lett},
  year = {2013},
  month = {Aug},
  number = {6},
  pages = {064801},
  volume = {111},
  abstract = {A model for a new electron-vortex beam production method is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The technique calls on the controlled manipulation of the degrees of freedom of the lens aberrations to achieve a helical phase front. These degrees of freedom are accessible by using the corrector lenses of a transmission electron microscope. The vortex beam is produced through a particular alignment of these lenses into a specifically designed astigmatic state and applying an annular aperture in the condenser plane. Experimental results are found to be in good agreement with simulations.},
  institution = {EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp, Belgium. laura.clark@ua.ac.be},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pmid = {23971578},
  timestamp = {2014.07.21}
}
@article{Baudoin2013,
  title = {Chromatic aberration-corrected tilt series transmission electron microscopy of nanoparticles in a whole mount macrophage cell.},
  author = {Baudoin, Jean-Pierre and Jinschek, Joerg R. and Boothroyd, Chris B. and Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. and {de Jonge}, Niels},
  journal = {Microsc Microanal},
  year = {2013},
  month = {Aug},
  number = {4},
  pages = {814--820},
  volume = {19},
  abstract = {Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with electron tomography is widely used to obtain nanometer scale three-dimensional (3D) structural information about biological samples. However, studies of whole eukaryotic cells are limited in resolution and/or contrast on account of the effect of chromatic aberration of the TEM objective lens on electrons that have been scattered inelastically in the specimen. As a result, 3D information is usually obtained from sections and not from whole cells. Here, we use chromatic aberration-corrected TEM to record bright-field TEM images of nanoparticles in a whole mount macrophage cell. Tilt series of images are used to generate electron tomograms, which are analyzed to assess the spatial resolution that can be achieved for different vertical positions in the specimen. The uptake of gold nanoparticles coated with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is studied. The LDL is found to assemble in clusters. The clusters contain nanoparticles taken up on different days, which are joined without mixing their nanoparticle cargo.},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927613001475},
  institution = {Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232-0615, USA.},
  keywords = {Cell Line; Electron Microscope Tomography, methods; Gold, metabolism; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, methods; Macrophages, metabolism/ultrastructure; Nanoparticles, metabolism/ultrastructure; Phagocytosis},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S1431927613001475},
  pmid = {23659678},
  timestamp = {2014.05.22},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1431927613001475}
}
@article{Frindt2014,
  title = {In-focus electrostatic Zach phase plate imaging for transmission electron microscopy with tunable phase contrast of frozen hydrated biological samples.},
  author = {Frindt, Nicole and Oster, Marco and Hettler, Simon and Gamm, Björn and Dieterle, Levin and Kowalsky, Wolfgang and Gerthsen, Dagmar and Schröder, Rasmus R.},
  journal = {Microsc Microanal},
  year = {2014},
  month = {Feb},
  number = {1},
  pages = {175--183},
  volume = {20},
  abstract = {Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of beam sensitive weak-phase objects such as biological cryo samples usually show a very low signal-to-noise ratio. These samples have almost no amplitude contrast and instead structural information is mainly encoded in the phase contrast. To increase the sample contrast in the image, especially for low spatial frequencies, the use of phase plates for close to focus phase contrast enhancement in TEM has long been discussed. Electrostatic phase plates are favorable in particular, as their tunable potential will allow an optimal phase shift adjustment and higher resolution than film phase plates as they avoid additional scattering events in matter. Here we show the first realization of close to focus phase contrast images of actin filament cryo samples acquired using an electrostatic Zach phase plate. Both positive and negative phase contrast is shown, which is obtained by applying appropriate potentials to the phase plate. The dependence of phase contrast improvement on sample orientation with respect to the phase plate is demonstrated and single-sideband artifacts are discussed. Additionally, possibilities to reduce contamination and charging effects of the phase plate are shown.},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927613013901},
  institution = {CellNetworks, BioQuant, Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 267, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S1431927613013901},
  pmid = {24382158},
  timestamp = {2014.05.22},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1431927613013901}
}
@article{Ramachandra2013,
  title = {The influence of the sample thickness on the lateral and axial resolution of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.},
  author = {Ramachandra, Ranjan and Demers, Hendrix and {de Jonge}, Niels},
  journal = {Microsc Microanal},
  year = {2013},
  month = {Feb},
  number = {1},
  pages = {93--101},
  volume = {19},
  abstract = {The lateral and axial resolution of three-dimensional (3D) focal series aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy was studied for samples of different thicknesses. The samples consisted of gold nanoparticles placed on the top and at the bottom of silicon nitride membranes of thickness between 50 and 500 nm. Atomic resolution was obtained for nanoparticles on top of 50-, 100-, and 200-nm-thick membranes with respect to the electron beam traveling downward. Atomic resolution was also achieved for nanoparticles placed below 50-, 100-, and 200-nm-thick membranes but with a lower contrast at the larger thicknesses. Beam broadening led to a reduced resolution for a 500-nm-thick membrane. The influence of the beam broadening on the axial resolution was also studied using Monte Carlo simulations with a 3D sample geometry.},
  doi = {10.1017/S143192761201392X},
  institution = {Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232-0615, USA.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S143192761201392X},
  pmid = {23290505},
  timestamp = {2014.05.22},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S143192761201392X}
}
@article{Kimoto2012,
  title = {Assessment of lower-voltage TEM performance using 3D Fourier transform of through-focus series.},
  author = {Kimoto, Koji and Kurashima, Keiji and Nagai, Takuro and Ohwada, Megumi and Ishizuka, Kazuo},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2012},
  month = {Oct},
  pages = {31--37},
  volume = {121},
  abstract = {We assess the imaging performance of a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) system operated at a relatively low acceleration voltage using the three-dimensional (3D) Fourier transform of through-focus images. Although a single diffractogram and the Thon diagram cannot distinguish between the linear and non-linear TEM imaging terms, the 3D Fourier transform allows us to evaluate linear imaging terms, resulting in a conclusive assessment of TEM performance. Using this method, information transfer up to 98 pm is demonstrated for an 80 kV TEM system equipped with a spherical aberration corrector and a monochromator. We also revisit the Young fringe method in the light of the 3D Fourier transform, and have found a considerable amount of non-linear terms in Young fringes at 80 kV even from a typical standard specimen, such as an amorphous Ge thin film.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2012.06.012},
  institution = {National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan. kimoto.koji@nims.go.jp},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(12)00134-9},
  pmid = {22922529},
  timestamp = {2013.12.20},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2012.06.012}
}
@article{Haeussler2013,
  title = {Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy analyses of GaAs/Si interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells.},
  author = {Häussler, Dietrich and Houben, Lothar and Essig, Stephanie and Kurttepeli, Mert and Dimroth, Frank and Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. and Jäger, Wolfgang},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2013},
  month = {Nov},
  pages = {55--61},
  volume = {134},
  abstract = {Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) investigations have been applied to investigate the structure and composition fluctuations near interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells. Multi-junction solar cells are of particular interest since efficiencies well above 40\% have been obtained for concentrator solar cells which are based on III-V compound semiconductors. In this methodologically oriented investigation, we explore the potential of combining aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field STEM imaging (HAADF-STEM) with spectroscopic techniques, such as EELS and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), and with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), in order to analyze the effects of fast atom beam (FAB) and ion beam bombardment (IB) activation treatments on the structure and composition of bonding interfaces of wafer-bonded solar cells on Si substrates. Investigations using STEM/EELS are able to measure quantitatively and with high precision the widths and the fluctuations in element distributions within amorphous interface layers of nanometer extensions, including those of light elements. Such measurements allow the control of the activation treatments and thus support assessing electrical conductivity phenomena connected with impurity and dopant distributions near interfaces for optimized performance of the solar cells.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2013.07.005},
  institution = {Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel, Germany.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(13)00191-5},
  pmid = {23916028},
  timestamp = {2013.11.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2013.07.005}
}
@article{Idrobo2012,
  title = {Identification of light elements in silicon nitride by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.},
  author = {Idrobo, Juan C. and Walkosz, Weronika and Klie, Robert F. and Oğüt, Serdar},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2012},
  month = {Dec},
  pages = {74--79},
  volume = {123},
  abstract = {In silicon nitride structural ceramics, the overall mechanical and thermal properties are controlled by the atomic and electronic structures at the interface between the ceramic grains and the amorphous intergranular films (IGFs) formed by various sintering additives. In the last ten years the atomic arrangements of heavy elements (rare-earths) at the Si(3)N(4)/IGF interfaces have been resolved. However, the atomic position of light elements, without which it is not possible to obtain a complete description of the interfaces, has been lacking. This review article details the authors' efforts to identify the atomic arrangement of light elements such as nitrogen and oxygen at the Si(3)N(4)/SiO(2) interface and in bulk Si(3)N(4) using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2012.05.008},
  institution = {Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA. idrobojc@ornl.gov},
  keywords = {Ceramics, chemistry; Elements; Light; Microscopy, Electron, Scanning Transmission, methods; Models, Molecular; Nitrogen, chemistry; Oxygen, chemistry; Silicon Compounds, chemistry; Silicon Dioxide, chemistry},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(12)00110-6},
  pmid = {22726263},
  timestamp = {2013.11.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2012.05.008}
}
@article{Hashimoto2012,
  title = {In situ observation of Pt nanoparticles on graphene layers under high temperature using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy.},
  author = {Hashimoto, Ayako and Takeguchi, Masaki},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2012},
  number = {6},
  pages = {409--413},
  volume = {61},
  abstract = {To study their thermal stability, we observed Pt colloidal nanoparticles on terraced graphene layers at high temperatures using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Not only Pt nanoparticles but also single Pt atoms were formed on the graphene layers by heating Pt colloids to 500-800°C. High resolution in situ observation showed that Pt nanoparticles and single atoms anchored to the edge of the graphene layers were relatively stationary under elevated temperatures, although some Pt atoms migrated on the graphene surfaces. The results indicated that the Pt single atoms at the edge of the graphene exhibited high-temperature stability.},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfs060},
  institution = {Surface Physics and Structure Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Japan.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {dfs060},
  pmid = {22952302},
  timestamp = {2013.10.17},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmicro/dfs060}
}
@article{Ricolleau2013,
  title = {Performances of an 80-200 kV microscope employing a cold-FEG and an aberration-corrected objective lens.},
  author = {Ricolleau, Christian and Nelayah, Jaysen and Oikawa, Tetsuo and Kohno, Yuji and Braidy, Nadi and Wang, Guillaulle and Hue, Florian and Florea, Lenuta and {Pierron Bohnes}, Véronique and Alloyeau, Damien},
  journal = {Microscopy (Oxf)},
  year = {2013},
  month = {Apr},
  number = {2},
  pages = {283--293},
  volume = {62},
  abstract = {The performances of a newly developed 80-200 kV cold field emission gun (CFEG) transmission electron microscope (TEM) integrating a spherical aberration corrector for a TEM image-forming lens have been evaluated. To begin, we show that the stability of both emission and probe currents makes use of this new CFEG much friendlier. The energy spread of electrons emitted from the CFEG has been measured as a function of emission current and shows a very last 0.26 eV energy resolution at 200 kV and even 0.23 eV at 80 kV. The combination of the CFEG and the CEOS™ aberration corrector, associated with enhanced mechanical and electrical stabilities of this new microscope, allows reaching an information transfer below 75 pm at 200 and 80 pm at 80 kV. This unseen resolution at 200 kV has allowed us to study the structure of CoPt nanoparticles by observing direct images of their atomic arrangement along the high indexes zone axis. We have evidenced the presence of defects in these nanostructures that are not parallel to the electron beam. The precise stoichiometry of two iron oxides, FeO and Fe2O3, has been determined from an analysis of iron valence state that was obtained from a direct analysis of EELS fine structures spectrum of the two oxides.},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfs072},
  institution = {Laboratoire Matériaux et Phénomènes Quantiques, Université Paris 7/CNRS, UMR 7162, Case 7021, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France. christian.ricolleau@univ-paris-diderot.fr},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {dfs072},
  pmid = {23160361},
  timestamp = {2013.10.17},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmicro/dfs072}
}
@article{Takeda2013,
  title = {Atomic-resolution environmental TEM for quantitative in-situ microscopy in materials science.},
  author = {Takeda, Seiji and Yoshida, Hideto},
  journal = {Microscopy (Oxf)},
  year = {2013},
  month = {Feb},
  number = {1},
  pages = {193--203},
  volume = {62},
  abstract = {We have compiled our recent in-situ quantitative environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) studies on typical gold nanoparticulate catalysts for the low-temperature oxidation of CO to describe the issues surrounding the application of ETEM, with a special regard to catalyst chemistry. Thanks to the recent development of high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopes that can work robustly to accumulate observation data in controlled environments, we can deal with the electron irradiation effects and heterogeneity of real catalysts. We established a structural evolution diagram that summarizes the structure of catalysts under electron irradiation as a function of the electron current density ϕ and the electron dose, D. By extrapolating to ϕ = 0, D = 0, we could deduce the intrinsic catalysis structure (without electron irradiation) in various environments, including reaction environments. By numerically and statistically analyzing a substantial number of ETEM images of gold nanoparticles, we established a morphology phase diagram that summarizes how the majority of gold nanoparticles change their morphology systematically as a function of the partial pressures of CO and O(2). Similar diagrams will be helpful in elucidating the phenomena that directly correlate with the catalytic activity determined from ETEM observations. Using these quantitative analyses, we could analyze Cs-corrected ETEM images of the catalysts. The surfaces of gold nanoparticles were structurally reconstructed under reaction conditions, via interactions with CO molecules. CO molecules were observed on the surfaces of catalysts under reaction conditions using high-resolution ETEM. Finally, we discuss the potential of environmental transmission electron microscopy for quantitative in-situ microscopy at the atomic scale.},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfs096},
  institution = {Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center, Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (ISIR), Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka, Japan. takeda@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {dfs096},
  pmid = {23325929},
  timestamp = {2013.10.17},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmicro/dfs096}
}
@article{Bar-Sadan2012,
  title = {Direct imaging of single Au atoms within GaAs nanowires.},
  author = {Bar-Sadan, Maya and Barthel, Juri and Shtrikman, Hadas and Houben, Lothar},
  journal = {Nano Lett},
  year = {2012},
  month = {May},
  number = {5},
  pages = {2352--2356},
  volume = {12},
  abstract = {Incorporation of catalyst atoms during the growth process of semiconductor nanowires reduces the electron mean free path and degrades their electronic properties. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is now capable of directly imaging single Au atoms within the dense matrix of a GaAs crystal, by slightly tilting the GaAs lattice planes with respect to the incident electron beam. Au doping values in the order of 10(17-18) cm(3) were measured, making ballistic transport through the nanowires practically inaccessible.},
  doi = {10.1021/nl300314k},
  institution = {Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany. barsadan@bgu.ac.il},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pmid = {22497234},
  timestamp = {2013.09.19},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl300314k}
}
@article{Konno2012,
  title = {High-resolution SEM observation at the atomic level using a dedicated STEM with aberration correction},
  author = {Konno, M and Suzuki, Y and Inada, H and Nakamura, K},
  journal = {Journal of Physics: Conference Series},
  year = {2012},
  month = {Jul},
  pages = {012011},
  volume = {371},
  doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/371/1/012011},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {IOP Publishing},
  timestamp = {2013.06.24},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/371/1/012011}
}
@article{Hansen2012,
  title = {Environmental transmission electron microscopy in an aberration-corrected environment.},
  author = {Thomas W Hansen and Jakob B Wagner},
  journal = {Microsc Microanal},
  year = {2012},
  month = {Aug},
  number = {4},
  pages = {684--690},
  volume = {18},
  abstract = {The increasing use of environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) in materials science provides exciting new possibilities for investigating chemical reactions and understanding both the interaction of fast electrons with gas molecules and the effect of the presence of gas on high-resolution imaging. A gaseous atmosphere in the pole-piece gap of the objective lens of the microscope alters both the incoming electron wave prior to interaction with the sample and the outgoing wave below the sample. Whereas conventional TEM samples are usually thin (below 100 nm), the gas in the environmental cell fills the entire gap between the pole pieces and is thus not spatially localized. By using an FEI Titan environmental transmission electron microscope equipped with a monochromator and an aberration corrector on the objective lens, we have investigated the effects on imaging and spectroscopy caused by the presence of the gas.},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927612000293},
  institution = {Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark. twh@cen.dtu.dk},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S1431927612000293},
  pmid = {22691205},
  timestamp = {2013.03.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1431927612000293}
}
@article{Pennycook2012,
  title = {Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy},
  author = {Pennycook,Stephen J. and Colliex,Christian},
  journal = {MRS Bulletin},
  year = {2012},
  month = {0},
  pages = {13--18},
  volume = {37},
  doi = {10.1557/mrs.2011.332},
  issn = {1938-1425},
  issue = {01},
  numpages = {6},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2013.03.21},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S0883769411003320}
}
@article{Wang2012,
  title = {Chromatic Confocal Electron Microscopy with a Finite Pinhole Size},
  author = {P Wang and A I Kirkland and P D Nellist},
  journal = {Journal of Physics: Conference Series},
  year = {2012},
  number = {1},
  pages = {012002},
  volume = {371},
  abstract = {Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) is a new imaging mode in electron microscopy. Spherical aberration corrected electron microscope instruments fitted with two aberration correctors can be used in this mode which provides improved depth resolution and selectivity compared to optical sectioning in a conventional scanning transmission geometry. In this article, we consider the depth resolution and energy resolution in the confocal optical configuration for SCEM using inelastically scattered electrons with a finite pinhole size. We experimentally demonstrate energy-filtered optical sectioning in a double aberration-corrected instrument with uncorrected chromatic aberration without using a dedicated energy filter.},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2013.03.21},
  url = {http://stacks.iop.org/1742-6596/371/i=1/a=012002}
}
@article{Hettler2012,
  title = {Improving fabrication and application of zach phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy.},
  author = {Simon Hettler and Björn Gamm and Manuel Dries and Nicole Frindt and Rasmus R Schröder and Dagmar Gerthsen},
  journal = {Microsc Microanal},
  year = {2012},
  month = {Oct},
  number = {5},
  pages = {1010--1015},
  volume = {18},
  abstract = {Zach phase plates (PPs) are promising devices to enhance phase contrast in transmission electron microscopy. The Zach PP shifts the phase of the zero-order beam by a strongly localized inhomogeneous electrostatic potential in the back focal plane of the objective lens. We present substantial improvements of the Zach PP, which overcome previous limitations. The implementation of a microstructured heating device significantly reduces contamination and charging of the PP structure and extends its lifetime. An improved production process allows fabricating PPs with reduced dimensions resulting in lower cut-on frequencies as revealed by simulations of the electrostatic potential. Phase contrast with inversion of PbSe nanoparticles is demonstrated in a standard transmission electron microscope with LaB6 cathode by applying different voltages.},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927612001560},
  institution = {ruhe, Germany.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S1431927612001560},
  pmid = {23058718},
  timestamp = {2012.11.22},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1431927612001560}
}
@article{Bell2012,
  title = {40 keV atomic resolution TEM.},
  author = {David C Bell and Christopher J Russo and Dmitry V Kolmykov},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2012},
  month = {Mar},
  pages = {31--37},
  volume = {114},
  abstract = {Here we present the first atomic resolution TEM imaging at 40 keV using an aberration-corrected, monochromated source TEM. Low-voltage High-Resolution Electron Microscopy (LVHREM) has several advantages, including increased cross-sections for inelastic and elastic scattering, increased contrast per electron and improved spectroscopy efficiency, decreased delocalization effects and reduced knock-on damage. Together, these often improve the contrast to damage ratio obtained on a large class of samples. Third-order aberration correction now allows us to operate the TEM at low energies while retaining atomic resolution, which was previously impossible. At low voltage the major limitation to resolution becomes the chromatic aberration limit. We show that using a source monochromator we are able to reduce the effect of chromatic aberration and achieve a usable high-resolution limit at 40 keV to less than 1Å. We show various materials' examples of the application of the technique to image graphene and silicon, and compare atomic resolution images with electron multislice simulations.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.12.001},
  institution = {School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. dcb@seas.harvard.edu},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(11)00338-X},
  pmid = {22356786},
  timestamp = {2012.08.29},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.12.001}
}
@article{Biskupek2012,
  title = {Effects of residual aberrations explored on single-walled carbon nanotubes.},
  author = {Johannes Biskupek and Peter Hartel and Maximilian Haider and Ute Kaiser},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2012},
  month = {May},
  pages = {1--7},
  volume = {116},
  abstract = {The effects of geometric residual aberrations such as coma B(2) and two-fold astigmatism A(1) on the contrast in aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images are investigated on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). The individual aberrations are adjusted and set up manually using an imaging C(S)-corrector. We demonstrate how coma B(2) can be recognized by an experienced user directly in the image and how it blurs the contrast. Even with uncorrected (resolution limiting) spherical aberration C(S) the coma B(2) has to be considered and must be minimized. Limits for a tolerable coma are given. The experiments are confirmed by image simulations.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2012.03.008},
  institution = {Central Facility of Electron Microscopy, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm, Germany. johannes.biskupek@uni-ulm.de},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(12)00050-2},
  pmid = {22534240},
  timestamp = {2012.08.29},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2012.03.008}
}
@article{Kim2012,
  title = {Local symmetry breaking of a thin crystal structure of β-Si3N4 as revealed by spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images.},
  author = {Hwang Su Kim and Zaoli Zhang and Ute Kaiser},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2012},
  number = {3},
  pages = {145--157},
  volume = {61},
  abstract = {This report is an extension of the study for structural imaging of 5-6 nm thick β-Si(3)N(4) [0001] crystal with a spherical aberration corrected transmission electron microscope by Zhang and Kaiser [2009. Structure imaging of β-Si(3)N(4) by spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Ultramicroscopy 109, 1114-1120]. In this work, a local symmetry breaking with an uneven resolution of dumbbells in the six-membered rings revealed in the reported images in the study of Zhang and Kaiser has been analyzed in detail. It is found that this local asymmetry in the image basically is not relevant to a slight mistilt of the specimen and/or a beam tilt (coma). Rather the certain variation of the tetrahedral bond length of Si-N(4) in the crystal structure is found to be responsible for the uneven resolution with a local structural variation from region to region. This characteristic of the variation is also supposed to give a distorted lattice of apparently 2°-2.5° deviations from the perfect hexagonal unit cell as observed in the reported image in the work of Zhang and Kaiser. It is discussed that this variation may prevail only in a thin specimen with a thickness ranging ∼≤5-6 nm. At the same time, it is noted that the average of the bond length variation is close to the fixed length known in a bulk crystal of β-Si(3)N(4).},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfs038},
  institution = {Department of Physics, Kyungsung University, Busan 608-736, Republic of Korea.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {dfs038},
  pmid = {22499470},
  timestamp = {2012.07.27},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmicro/dfs038}
}
@article{Zhang2012,
  title = {Three-dimensional observation of SiO2 hollow spheres with a double-shell structure using aberration-corrected scanning confocal electron microscopy.},
  author = {Xiaobin Zhang and Masaki Takeguchi and Ayako Hashimoto and Kazutaka Mitsuishi and Peng Wang and Peter D Nellist and Angus I Kirkland and Meguru Tezuka and Masayuki Shimojo},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2012},
  number = {3},
  pages = {159--169},
  volume = {61},
  abstract = {Optical sectioning using scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) is a new three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique which promises improved depth resolution, particularly for laterally extended objects. Using a stage-scanning system to move the specimen in three dimensions, two-dimensional (2D) images sliced from any plane in XYZ space can be obtained in shorter acquisition times than those required for conventional electron tomography. In this paper, a double aberration-corrected SCEM used in annular dark-field mode was used to observe the 3D structure of SiO(2) hollow spheres fabricated by a carbon template method. The double-shell structure of the sample was clearly reflected in both XY- and XZ-sliced images. However, elongation along the optical axis was still evident in the XZ-sliced images even when double aberration correctors were used. Application of a deconvolution technique to the experimental XZ-sliced images reduced the elongated shell thicknesses of the SiO(2) sphere by 40-50\% and the selectivity of information at a certain sample depth was also enhanced. Subsequently, 3D reconstruction by stacking the deconvoluted slice images restored the spherical surface of a SiO(2) sphere.},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfs039},
  institution = {Materials Science and Engineering, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya, Saitama 369-0293, Japan.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {dfs039},
  pmid = {22460388},
  timestamp = {2012.07.27},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmicro/dfs039}
}
@article{Jiang2012,
  title = {Performance and early applications of a versatile double aberration-corrected JEOL-2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at Aalto University},
  author = {Jiang, Hua and Ruokolainen, Janne and Young, Neil and Oikawa, Tetsuo and Nasibulin, Albert G. and Kirkland, Angus and Kauppinen, Esko I.},
  journal = {Micron},
  year = {2012},
  month = mar,
  number = {4},
  pages = {545--550},
  volume = {43},
  abstract = {Applications relevant to carbon based nano-materials have been explored using a newly installed JEOL-2200FS field emission gun (FEG) (scanning) transmission electron microscope (S)TEM which is integrated with two CEOS aberration correctors for both the TEM image-forming and the STEM probe-forming lenses. The performance and utility of this newly commission hardware has been reviewed with a particular focus on operation at an acceleration voltage of 80 kV, thus bringing the primary electron beam voltage below the knock-on threshold for carbon materials and opening up a range of possibilities for the study of carbon-based nanostructures in the aberration-corrected electron microscope. The ability of the microscope to obtain both atomic TEM images and high-quality electron diffraction patterns from carbon nanotubes was demonstrated. The chiral structure of a double-walled carbon nanotube was determined from its diffraction pattern. The aberration corrected TEM imaging technique facilitates a unique approach to accurate determination of single-walled carbon nanotube diameters. On the other hand, the probe-corrected high angle annular dark field (HAADF) STEM imaging performance allows for the detection of single gold atoms at 80 kV and was used to study the graphite interlayer spacing in a multi-walled carbon nanotube.},
  booktitle = {Advancing HR-TEM and HR-STEM},
  issn = {0968-4328},
  keywords = {TEM/STEM, Spherical aberration correction, 80 kV, Electron diffraction, Carbon nanotubes, Single gold atom detection},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2012.06.22},
  url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0968432811001806}
}
@article{Jinschek2011,
  title = {Still “Plenty of Room at the Bottom” for Aberration-Corrected TEM},
  author = {Jinschek,Joerg R. and Yucelen,Emrah and Freitag,Bert and Calderon,Hector A. and Steinbach,Andy},
  journal = {Microscopy Today},
  year = {2011},
  number = {03},
  pages = {10-14},
  volume = {19},
  abstract = { ABSTRACT In his now-famous 1959 speech on nanotechnology, Richard Feynman proposed that it should be possible to see the individual atoms in a material, if only the electron microscope could be made 100 times better. With the development of aberration correctors on transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) over the last decade, this dream of microscopists to directly image structures atom-by-atom has come close to an everyday reality. Figure 1 shows such a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) image of a single-wall carbon nanotube obtained with an aberration-corrected TEM. Now that atomic-resolution images have become possible with aberration-corrector technology in both TEM and STEM, we can ask ourselves if we truly have achieved the goal of seeing individual atoms. Most aberration-corrected images exhibiting atomic resolution are not distinguishing individual atoms, but columns of a small number of atoms, so despite this remarkable achievement, there is still “plenty of room at the bottom” in order to move toward seeing, counting, and quantifying individual atoms. In fact, there never has been a more exciting time for electron microscopists. },
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S155192951100023X},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2012.06.22},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8257505}
}
@article{Kirkland2011,
  title = {On the optimum probe in aberration corrected ADF-STEM.},
  author = {Earl J Kirkland},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2011},
  month = {Nov},
  number = {11},
  pages = {1523--1530},
  volume = {111},
  abstract = {New aberration correctors present new challenges in optimizing (minimizing) the probe size in the STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope). A small probe is important for high resolution imaging and analytical microscopy. Some effects of aperture size, corrector accuracy, and higher order aberrations on probe size and image artifacts are calculated. Accumulated small errors in the aberration corrector can produce a significant decrease in image contrast, which may be important in quantitative image comparisons of theory and experiment. It is important to match the objective aperture to the accuracy of the corrector instead of just the (third order) spherical aberration of the objective as in the commonly used Scherzer conditions.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.09.002},
  institution = {School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United States. ejk14@cornell.edu},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(11)00212-9},
  pmid = {21939617},
  timestamp = {2012.06.22},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.09.002}
}
@article{Texier2012,
  title = {Optimum correction conditions for aberration-corrected HRTEM SiC dumbbells chemical imaging},
  author = {Michaël Texier and Jany Thibault-Pénisson},
  journal = {Micron},
  year = {2012},
  note = {Advancing HR-TEM and HR-STEM},
  number = {4},
  pages = {516 - 523},
  volume = {43},
  abstract = {Over the last decade, the spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopes has been considerably improved thanks to the development of aberration correctors. At the same time, image interpretation has become easier as the influence of instrument aberrations on image intensity has been reduced for phase contrast imaging. New aberration-corrected microscopes now offer the possibility to extract both the structural and the chemical information from a quantitative analysis of the image's contrast, which is promising in many fields of materials science where knowledge of the chemical content at the atomic scale is crucial. However, appropriate imaging conditions must be used for a quantitative analysis of the image at the sub-angström scale. In this paper, we focus on the impact of chromatic and geometric aberrations on phase contrast and we compare the advantages offered by the few optimum imaging conditions proposed in the literature. Effects of residual aberrations are also considered while the influence of chromatic aberration correction in future Cs/Cc-corrected instruments is emphasized. A critical value of Cc is given depending on the instrumental parameters. Silicon carbide imaging using a Cs-corrected microscope is presented and illustrates the assessments derived from the theoretical study of residual aberration influence on phase contrast imaging.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.micron.2011.09.014},
  issn = {0968-4328},
  keywords = {Chromatic aberration},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2012.06.22},
  url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0968432811001727}
}
@article{Yuk2012,
  title = {High-resolution EM of colloidal nanocrystal growth using graphene liquid cells.},
  author = {Jong Min Yuk and Jungwon Park and Peter Ercius and Kwanpyo Kim and Daniel J Hellebusch and Michael F Crommie and Jeong Yong Lee and A. Zettl and A. Paul Alivisatos},
  journal = {Science},
  year = {2012},
  month = {Apr},
  number = {6077},
  pages = {61--64},
  volume = {336},
  abstract = {We introduce a new type of liquid cell for in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based on entrapment of a liquid film between layers of graphene. The graphene liquid cell facilitates atomic-level resolution imaging while sustaining the most realistic liquid conditions achievable under electron-beam radiation. We employ this cell to explore the mechanism of colloidal platinum nanocrystal growth. Direct atomic-resolution imaging allows us to visualize critical steps in the process, including site-selective coalescence, structural reshaping after coalescence, and surface faceting.},
  doi = {10.1126/science.1217654},
  institution = {Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {336/6077/61},
  pmid = {22491849},
  timestamp = {2012.06.22},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1217654}
}
@article{Gamm2012,
  title = {Quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of single atoms.},
  author = {Björn Gamm and Holger Blank and Radian Popescu and Reinhard Schneider and André Beyer and Armin Gölzhäuser and Dagmar Gerthsen},
  journal = {Microsc Microanal},
  year = {2012},
  month = {Feb},
  number = {1},
  pages = {212--217},
  volume = {18},
  abstract = {Single atoms can be considered as the most basic objects for electron microscopy to test the microscope performance and basic concepts for modeling image contrast. In this work high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied to image single platinum, molybdenum, and titanium atoms in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The atoms are deposited on a self-assembled monolayer substrate that induces only negligible contrast. Single-atom contrast simulations were performed on the basis of Weickenmeier-Kohl and Doyle-Turner form factors. Experimental and simulated image intensities are in quantitative agreement on an absolute intensity scale, which is provided by the vacuum image intensity. This demonstrates that direct testing of basic properties such as form factors becomes feasible.},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927611012232},
  institution = {Laboratorium für Elektronenmikroskopie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, 76128 Karlsruhe, Germany. gamm@kit.edu},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S1431927611012232},
  pmid = {22153521},
  timestamp = {2012.03.23},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1431927611012232}
}
@article{Lupini2011,
  title = {The three-dimensional point spread function of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.},
  author = {Andrew R Lupini and Niels de Jonge},
  journal = {Microsc Microanal},
  year = {2011},
  month = {Oct},
  number = {5},
  pages = {817--826},
  volume = {17},
  abstract = {Aberration correction reduces the depth of field in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and thus allows three-dimensional (3D) imaging by depth sectioning. This imaging mode offers the potential for sub-Ångstrom lateral resolution and nanometer-scale depth sensitivity. For biological samples, which may be many microns across and where high lateral resolution may not always be needed, optimizing the depth resolution even at the expense of lateral resolution may be desired, aiming to image through thick specimens. Although there has been extensive work examining and optimizing the probe formation in two dimensions, there is less known about the probe shape along the optical axis. Here the probe shape is examined in three dimensions in an attempt to better understand the depth resolution in this mode. Examples are presented of how aberrations change the probe shape in three dimensions, and it is found that off-axial aberrations may need to be considered for focal series of large areas. It is shown that oversized or annular apertures theoretically improve the vertical resolution for 3D imaging of nanoparticles. When imaging nanoparticles of several nanometer size, regular STEM can thereby be optimized such that the vertical full-width at half-maximum approaches that of the aberration-corrected STEM with a standard aperture.},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927611011913},
  institution = {Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064, USA.},
  keywords = {Imaging, Three-Dimensional, methods; Microscopy, Electron, Scanning Transmission, methods},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S1431927611011913},
  pmid = {21878149},
  timestamp = {2012.03.23},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1431927611011913}
}
@article{Ramachandra2012,
  title = {Optimized deconvolution for maximum axial resolution in three-dimensional aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.},
  author = {Ranjan Ramachandra and Niels de Jonge},
  journal = {Microsc Microanal},
  year = {2012},
  month = {Feb},
  number = {1},
  pages = {218--228},
  volume = {18},
  abstract = {Three-dimensional (3D) datasets were recorded of gold nanoparticles placed on both sides of silicon nitride membranes using focal series aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Deconvolution of the 3D datasets was applied to obtain the highest possible axial resolution. The deconvolution involved two different point spread functions, each calculated iteratively via blind deconvolution. Supporting membranes of different thicknesses were tested to study the effect of beam broadening on the deconvolution. It was found that several iterations of deconvolution was efficient in reducing the imaging noise. With an increasing number of iterations, the axial resolution was increased, and most of the structural information was preserved. Additional iterations improved the axial resolution by maximal a factor of 4 to 6, depending on the particular dataset, and up to 8 nm maximal, but also led to a reduction of the lateral size of the nanoparticles in the image. Thus, the deconvolution procedure optimized for the highest axial resolution is best suited for applications where one is interested in the 3D locations of nanoparticles only.},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927611012347},
  institution = {Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Nashville, TN 37232-0615, USA.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S1431927611012347},
  pmid = {22152090},
  timestamp = {2012.03.23},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1431927611012347}
}
@article{Alem2011a,
  title = {Vacancy growth and migration dynamics in atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride under electron beam irradiation},
  author = {Alem, N. and Erni, R. and Kisielowski, C. and Rossell, M. D.and Hartel, P. and Jiang, B. and Gannett, W. and Zettl, A.},
  journal = {physica status solidi (RRL) - Rapid Research Letters},
  year = {2011},
  number = {8},
  pages = {295–297},
  volume = {5},
  doi = {10.1002/pssr.201105262},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2011.12.15}
}
@article{Barton2011,
  title = {In-focus electron microscopy of frozen-hydrated biological samples with a Boersch phase plate.},
  author = {B. Barton and D. Rhinow and A. Walter and R. Schröder and G. Benner and E. Majorovits and M. Matijevic and H. Niebel and H. Müller and M. Haider and M. Lacher and S. Schmitz and P. Holik and W. Kühlbrandt},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2011},
  month = {Dec},
  number = {12},
  pages = {1696--1705},
  volume = {111},
  abstract = {We report the implementation of an electrostatic Einzel lens (Boersch) phase plate in a prototype transmission electron microscope dedicated to aberration-corrected cryo-EM. The combination of phase plate, C(s) corrector and Diffraction Magnification Unit (DMU) as a new electron-optical element ensures minimal information loss due to obstruction by the phase plate and enables in-focus phase contrast imaging of large macromolecular assemblies. As no defocussing is necessary and the spherical aberration is corrected, maximal, non-oscillating phase contrast transfer can be achieved up to the information limit of the instrument. A microchip produced by a scalable micro-fabrication process has 10 phase plates, which are positioned in a conjugate, magnified diffraction plane generated by the DMU. Phase plates remained fully functional for weeks or months. The large distance between phase plate and the cryo sample permits the use of an effective anti-contaminator, resulting in ice contamination rates of <0.6nm/h at the specimen. Maximal in-focus phase contrast was obtained by applying voltages between 80 and 700mV to the phase plate electrode. The phase plate allows for in-focus imaging of biological objects with a signal-to-noise of 5-10 at a resolution of 2-3nm, as demonstrated for frozen-hydrated virus particles and purple membrane at liquid-nitrogen temperature.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.09.007},
  institution = {Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue Str. 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(11)00225-7},
  pmid = {22088444},
  timestamp = {2011.11.30},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.09.007}
}
@article{Kaiser2011,
  title = {Transmission electron microscopy at 20 kV for imaging and spectroscopy.},
  author = {U. Kaiser and J. Biskupek and J. C. Meyer and J. Leschner and L. Lechner and H. Rose and M. Stöger-Pollach and A. N. Khlobystov and P. Hartel and H. Müller and M. Haider and S. Eyhusen and G. Benner},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2011},
  month = {Jul},
  number = {8},
  pages = {1239--1246},
  volume = {111},
  abstract = {The electron optical performance of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is characterized for direct spatial imaging and spectroscopy using electrons with energies as low as 20 keV. The highly stable instrument is equipped with an electrostatic monochromator and a C(S)-corrector. At 20 kV it shows high image contrast even for single-layer graphene with a lattice transfer of 213 pm (tilted illumination). For 4 nm thick Si, the 200 reflections (271.5 pm) were directly transferred (axial illumination). We show at 20 kV that radiation-sensitive fullerenes (C(60)) within a carbon nanotube container withstand an about two orders of magnitude higher electron dose than at 80 kV. In spectroscopy mode, the monochromated low-energy electron beam enables the acquisition of EELS spectra up to very high energy losses with exceptionally low background noise. Using Si and Ge, we show that 20 kV TEM allows the determination of dielectric properties and narrow band gaps, which were not accessible by TEM so far. These very first results demonstrate that low kV TEM is an exciting new tool for determination of structural and electronic properties of different types of nano-materials.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.03.012},
  institution = {Central Facility of Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm, Germany. ute.kaiser@uni-ulm.de},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(11)00119-7},
  pmid = {21801697},
  timestamp = {2011.11.30},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.03.012}
}
@article{Lee2012,
  title = {Optimum HRTEM image contrast at 20 kV and 80 kV Exemplified by graphene},
  author = {Z. Lee and J.C. Meyer and H. Rose and U. Kaiser},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2012},
  number = {1},
  pages = {39 - 46},
  volume = {112},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.10.009},
  issn = {0304-3991},
  keywords = {Graphene},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2011.11.30},
  url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304399111002543}
}
@article{Wang2011,
  title = {Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.},
  author = {Peng Wang and Gavin Behan and Angus I Kirkland and Peter D Nellist and Eireann C Cosgriff and Adrian J D'Alfonso and Andrew J Morgan and Leslie J Allen and Ayako Hashimoto and Masaki Takeguchi and Kazutaka Mitsuishi and Masayuki Shimojo},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2011},
  month = {Jun},
  number = {7},
  pages = {877--886},
  volume = {111},
  abstract = {Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2010.10.012},
  institution = {Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX13PH, UK.},
  keywords = {Electrons; Gold, chemistry; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, methods; Lens, Crystalline, chemistry; Metal Nanoparticles, chemistry; Microscopy, Confocal, methods; Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, methods},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(10)00266-4},
  pmid = {21093152},
  timestamp = {2011.11.30},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2010.10.012}
}
@article{Benner2011,
  title = {Nano beam diffraction and precession in an energy filtered CS corrected transmission electron microscope},
  author = {Benner, G. and Niebel, H. and Pavia, G.},
  journal = {Crystal Research and Technology},
  year = {2011},
  number = {6},
  pages = {580--588},
  volume = {46},
  abstract = {Abstract Nano beam diffraction is a prerequisite to collecting structural information from particles as small as 1 nm in diameter. We describe here a novel ray path, where the limiting illumination aperture is arranged higher up in the illumination system of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) so that it can be demagnified further. This results in a high flexibility concerning the illuminating field and electron beam convergence angle without any need for readjustments of pivot points and refocusing of the diffraction lens. We show that artifact-free diffraction patterns can be obtained with diffraction fields down to 20 nm in diameter under genuine parallel illumination conditions. The limitations of the nano beam diffraction mode by physical diffraction effects are discussed. Either the illumination field or the diffraction spots or both may show diffraction fringes as a result of these effects. Zero energy loss filtering of (precession) electron diffraction spot patterns increases their contrast and makes weak diffraction spots visible. A method to acquire (energy filtered precession) electron diffraction spot pattern in a spherical aberration (CS) corrected TEM has been developed and first results are presented. (© 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)},
  doi = {10.1002/crat.201000582},
  issn = {1521-4079},
  keywords = {nano beam diffraction, precession electron diffraction, CS corrector},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {WILEY-VCH Verlag},
  timestamp = {2011.07.05},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/crat.201000582}
}
@article{Alem2011,
  title = {Probing the Out-of-Plane Distortion of Single Point Defects in Atomically Thin Hexagonal Boron Nitride at the Picometer Scale},
  author = {Alem, Nasim and Yazyev, Oleg V. and Kisielowski, Christian and Denes, P. and Dahmen, Ulrich and Hartel, Peter and Haider, Maximilian and Bischoff, Maarten and Jiang, Bin and Louie, Steven G. and Zettl, A. },
  journal = {Phys. Rev. Lett.},
  year = {2011},
  month = {Mar},
  number = {12},
  pages = {126102},
  volume = {106},
  doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.126102},
  numpages = {4},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {American Physical Society},
  timestamp = {2011.03.30}
}
@article{Dries2011,
  title = {Object-wave reconstruction by carbon film-based Zernike- and Hilbert-phase plate microscopy: a theoretical study not restricted to weak-phase objects.},
  author = {M. Dries and K. Schultheiss and B. Gamm and A. Rosenauer and R. R. Schröder and D. Gerthsen},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2011},
  month = {Jan},
  number = {2},
  pages = {159--168},
  volume = {111},
  abstract = {Transmission electron microscopy phase-contrast images taken by amorphous carbon film-based phase plates are affected by the scattering of electrons within the carbon film causing a modification of the image-wave function. Moreover, image artefacts are produced by non-centrosymmetric phase plate designs such as the Hilbert-phase plate. Various methods are presented to correct phase-contrast images with respect to the scattering of electrons and image artefacts induced by phase plates. The proposed techniques are not restricted to weak-phase objects and linear image formation. Phase-contrast images corrected by the presented methods correspond to those taken by an ideal centrosymmetric, matter-free phase plate and are suitable for object-wave reconstruction.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2010.10.009},
  institution = {Laboratorium für Elektronenmikroskopie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), D-76128 Karlsruhe, Germany. manuel.dries@kit.edu},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(10)00263-9},
  pmid = {21185461},
  timestamp = {2011.03.30},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2010.10.009}
}
@article{Garbrecht2011,
  title = {Quantitative atom column position analysis at the incommensurate interfaces of a (PbS)(1.14)NbS(2) misfit layered compound with aberration-corrected HRTEM.},
  author = {M. Garbrecht and E. Spiecker and K. Tillmann and W. Jäger},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2011},
  month = {Feb},
  number = {3},
  pages = {245--250},
  volume = {111},
  abstract = {Aberration-corrected HRTEM is applied to explore the potential of NCSI contrast imaging to quantitatively analyse the complex atomic structure of misfit layered compounds and their incommensurate interfaces. Using the (PbS)(1.14)NbS(2) misfit layered compound as a model system it is shown that atom column position analyses at the incommensurate interfaces can be performed with precisions reaching a statistical accuracy of ±6pm. The procedure adopted for these studies compares experimental images taken from compound regions free of defects and interface modulations with a structure model derived from XRD experiments and with multi-slice image simulations for the corresponding NCSI contrast conditions used. The high precision achievable in such experiments is confirmed by a detailed quantitative analysis of the atom column positions at the incommensurate interfaces, proving a tetragonal distortion of the monochalcogenide sublattice.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2010.11.031},
  institution = {Microanalysis of Materials, Institute of Materials Science, University of Kiel, 24143 Kiel, Germany. mag@technion.ac.il},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(10)00321-9},
  pmid = {21333862},
  timestamp = {2011.03.30},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2010.11.031}
}
@article{Yamazaki2011,
  title = {Analysis of EEL spectrum of low-loss region using the C(s)-corrected STEM-EELS method and multivariate analysis.},
  author = {Takashi Yamazaki and Yasutoshi Kotaka and Yuji Kataoka},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2011},
  month = {Apr},
  number = {5},
  pages = {303--308},
  volume = {111},
  abstract = {We analyzed a Si/SiO(2) interface using multivariate analysis and spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy which is characterized by using the electron energy loss spectrum of the low-loss region. We extracted the low-loss spectra of Si, SiO(2) and an interface state. Even if the interface is formed from materials with different dielectric functions, the present method will prove suitable for obtaining a more quantitative understanding of the dielectric characteristic.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.01.005},
  institution = { Materials Laboratories, Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., 10-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi 243-0197, Japan.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(11)00020-9},
  pmid = {21396523},
  timestamp = {2011.03.30},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.01.005}
}
@article{Schultheiss2010,
  title = {New electrostatic phase plate for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy and its application for wave-function reconstruction.},
  author = {Katrin Schultheiss and Joachim Zach and Bjoern Gamm and Manuel Dries and Nicole Frindt and Rasmus R Schröder and Dagmar Gerthsen},
  journal = {Microsc Microanal},
  year = {2010},
  month = {Dec},
  number = {6},
  pages = {785--794},
  volume = {16},
  abstract = {A promising novel type of electrostatic phase plate for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented. The phase plate consists of a single microcoaxial cable-like rod with its electrode exposed to the undiffracted electrons. The emerging field is used to shift the phase of the undiffracted electrons with respect to diffracted electrons. The design overcomes the drawback of the spatial frequency-blocking ring electrode of the Boersch phase plate. First, experimental phase-contrast images are presented for PbSe and Pt nanoparticles with clearly varying phase contrast, which depends on the applied voltage and resulting phase shift of the unscattered electrons. With the new phase-plate design, we show for the first time the reconstruction of an object wave function based on a series of only three experimental phase-contrast TEM images obtained with an electrostatic phase plate.},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927610093803},
  institution = {Laboratorium für Elektronenmikroskopie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), D-76128 Karlsruhe, Germany. katrin.schultheiss@kit.edu},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S1431927610093803},
  pmid = {20946700},
  timestamp = {2011.02.16},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1431927610093803}
}
@article{HansenNovember2010,
  title = {Aberration corrected and monochromated environmental transmission electron microscopy: challenges and prospects for materials science},
  author = {Hansen, T.W. and Wagner, J.B. and Dunin-Borkowski, R.E.},
  journal = {Materials Science and Technology},
  year = {November 2010},
  pages = {1338-1344(7)},
  volume = {26},
  abstract = {The latest generation of environmental transmission electron microscopes incorporates aberration correctors and monochromators, allowing studies of chemical reactions and growth processes with improved spatial resolution and spectral sensitivity. Here, we describe the performance of such an instrument using examples taken from studies of fuel cells and supported catalysts. We discuss the challenges involved in performing in situ gas reaction experiments quantitatively and reliably and we highlight the care required to understand the effect of the electron beam on dynamic experiments performed in the electron microscope.},
  doi = {10.1179/026708310X12756557336355},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2011.01.19},
  url = {http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/maney/mst/2010/00000026/00000011/art00014}
}
@article{PhysRevB.82.165443,
  title = {Stability and dynamics of small molecules trapped on graphene},
  author = {Erni, Rolf and Rossell, Marta D. and Nguyen, Manh-Thuong and Blankenburg, Stephan and Passerone, Daniele and Hartel, Peter and Alem, Nasim and Erickson, Kris and Gannett, Will and Zettl, Alex},
  journal = {Phys. Rev. B},
  year = {2010},
  month = {Oct},
  number = {16},
  pages = {165443},
  volume = {82},
  doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.82.165443},
  numpages = {6},
  owner = {zach},
  publisher = {American Physical Society},
  timestamp = {2010.11.03}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7835134,
  title = {Behavior of Au Species in Au/Fe2O3 Catalysts Characterized by Novel In Situ Heating Techniques and Aberration-Corrected STEM Imaging},
  author = {Allard,Lawrence F. and Flytzani-Stephanopoulos,Maria and Overbury,Steven H.},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {04},
  pages = {375-385},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927610013486},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1431927610013486},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7835134&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S1431927610013486}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7835158,
  title = {Sub-Angstrom Low-Voltage Performance of a Monochromated, Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope},
  author = {Bell,David C. and Russo,Christopher J. and Benner,Gerd},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {04},
  pages = {386-392},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927610093670},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1431927610093670},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7835158&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S1431927610093670}
}
@article{Cheynet2010,
  title = {New fine structures resolved at the ELNES Ti-L2,3 edge spectra of anatase and rutile: Comparison between experiment and calculation.},
  author = {M. Cheynet and S. Pokrant and S. Irsen and P. Krüger},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2010},
  month = {Jul},
  number = {8},
  pages = {1046--1053},
  volume = {110},
  abstract = {Anatase and rutile Ti-L(2,3) edge spectra were measured in electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) coupled to a CEOS Cs-probe corrector, an omega-type monochromator and an in-column omega-type energy filter fully corrected for 2nd order aberrations. Thanks to the high energy resolution, high electron probe current and high stability achieved under this instrumental configuration, new fine structures, never reported before, were resolved at the L(3) band of both rutile and anatase. The data suggest that new peaks also exist in the L(2) e(g) band. The experimental spectra are compared with multichannel multiple scattering (MMS) calculations. Good agreement is found for number, energy position and intensity of the newly resolved spectral features. Up to now, the L(3) e(g) band splitting could not be well described by theory not even through the crystal field multiplet approach. We show that the L(3) e(g) band splitting is due to long range band structure effects, contrary to the usual interpretations in terms of local ligand field or near-neighbour hybridization effects.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2010.03.001},
  institution = {SIMAP-PHELMA-CNRS, BP 75, 38402 Saint-Martin-d'Hères, France. marie.cheynet@simap.grenoble-inp.fr},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(10)00079-3},
  pmid = {20381249},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2010.03.001}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7835137,
  title = {Information Transfer in a TEM Corrected for Spherical and Chromatic Aberration},
  author = {Haider,M. and Hartel,P. and Müller,H. and Uhlemann,S. and Zach,J.},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {04},
  pages = {393-408},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927610013498},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1431927610013498},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7835137&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S1431927610013498}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7835143,
  title = {Exceeding Conventional Resolution Limits in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Using Tilted Illumination and Exit-Wave Restoration},
  author = {Haigh,Sarah J. and Sawada,Hidetaka and Takayanagi,Kunio and Kirkland,Angus I.},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {04},
  pages = {409-415},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927610093359},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1431927610093359},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7835143&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S1431927610093359}
}
@article{1742-6596-241-1-012027,
  title = {Dark-field electron holography for the mapping of strain in nanostructures: correcting artefacts and aberrations},
  author = {M J Hÿtch and F Houdellier and F Hüe and E Snoeck},
  journal = {Journal of Physics: Conference Series},
  year = {2010},
  number = {1},
  pages = {012027},
  volume = {241},
  abstract = {We present details of the new electron holographic dark-field technique (HoloDark) for mapping strain in nanostructures. A diffracted beam emanating from an unstrained region of crystal is interfered (with the aid of an electrostatic biprism) with a diffracted beam from the strained region of interest. Geometric phase analysis (GPA) of the holographic fringes determines the relative deformation of the two crystalline lattices. Strain can be measured to high precision, with nanometre spatial resolution and for micron fields of view. Experiments are carried out on the SACTEM-Toulouse, a Tecnai F20 (FEI) equipped with imaging aberration corrector (CEOS), field-emission gun and rotatable biprism (FEI). We operate the microscope in free-lens control with the main objective lens switched off and using the corrector transfer lenses as a Lorentz lens. We will present measurements of strain in test nanostructures and show how artefacts from thickness variations can be removed. Finally, we show our first results using a recently developed aberration-corrected Lorentz mode (CEOS).},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://stacks.iop.org/1742-6596/241/i=1/a=012027}
}
@article{1742-6596-241-1-012011,
  title = {Application of 80-200 kV aberration corrected dedicated STEM with cold FEG},
  author = {M Konno and Y Suzuki and H Inada and K Nakamura},
  journal = {Journal of Physics: Conference Series},
  year = {2010},
  number = {1},
  pages = {012011},
  volume = {241},
  abstract = {We have developed new STEM instrumentation with a cold field emission source (Hitachi HD-2700) in order to perform structural characterization and elemental mapping at the atomic level. The instrument utilises the CEOS GmbH (Germany, managing director: Dr. Max Haider) aberration corrector. The accelerating voltage range is between 80 kV and 200 kV. The cold field emission source proves to be the ideal emitter for analytical transmission electron microscopes due to its high brightness, high current density and small energy spread. In this study, we have examined low accelerating voltage conditions for obtaining high image contrast and high performance elemental analysis (in which FWHM of zero loss peaks are 0.3 eV for acquisition time of 1 second and 0.34 eV for acquisition time of 40 second by accelerating voltage of 80 kV, respectively). We have observed high contrast bright field STEM images of graphene carbon at an accelerating voltage of 80 kV, in which lattice fringes can be clearly seen.},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://stacks.iop.org/1742-6596/241/i=1/a=012011}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7835140,
  title = {Imaging, Core-Loss, and Low-Loss Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Mapping in Aberration-Corrected STEM},
  author = {Lazar,Sorin and Shao,Yang and Gunawan,Lina and Nechache,Riad and Pignolet,Alain and Botton,Gianluigi A.},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {04},
  pages = {416-424},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927610013504},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1431927610013504},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7835140&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S1431927610013504}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7835149,
  title = {Aberration Correction and Electron Holography},
  author = {Lichte,Hannes and Linck,Martin and Geiger,Dorin and Lehmann,Michael},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {04},
  pages = {434-440},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927610093633},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1431927610093633},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7835149&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S1431927610093633}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7835128,
  title = {Surface Channeling in Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Nanostructures},
  author = {Liu,Jingyue and Allard,Lawrence F.},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {04},
  pages = {425-433},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927610000450},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1431927610000450},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7835128&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S1431927610000450}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7835113,
  title = {The Contributions of Otto Scherzer (1909?1982) to the Development of the Electron Microscope},
  author = {Marko,Michael and Rose,Harald},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {04},
  pages = {366-374},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S143192761000019X},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S143192761000019X},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7835113&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S143192761000019X}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7835161,
  title = {Introduction: The Otto Scherzer Special Issue on Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscopy},
  author = {Smith,David J. and Dahmen,Uli},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {04},
  pages = {365-365},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927610093700},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1431927610093700},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7835161&fulltextType=ED&fileId=S1431927610093700}
}
@article{1742-6596-241-1-012012,
  title = {Experimental setup for energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscopy (EFSCEM) in a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope},
  author = {P Wang and G Behan and A I Kirkland and P D Nellist},
  journal = {Journal of Physics: Conference Series},
  year = {2010},
  number = {1},
  pages = {012012},
  volume = {241},
  abstract = {Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) is a new imaging mode in electron microscopy. Spherical aberration corrected electron microscope instruments fitted with two aberration correctors can be used in this mode which provides improved depth resolution and selectivity compared to optical sectioning in a conventional scanning transmission geometry. In this article, we consider a confocal optical configuration for SCEM using inelastically scattered electrons. We lay out the necessary steps for achieving this new operational mode in a double aberration-corrected instrument with uncorrected chromatic aberration and present preliminary experimental results in such mode.},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://stacks.iop.org/1742-6596/241/i=1/a=012012}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7835146,
  title = {Three-Dimensional Imaging in Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscopes},
  author = {Xin,Huolin L. and Muller,David A.},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {04},
  pages = {445-455},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927610093360},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1431927610093360},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7835146&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S1431927610093360}
}
@article{Yi2010,
  title = {Flexible formation of coherent probes on an aberration-corrected STEM with three condensers.},
  author = {Feng Yi and Peter Tiemeijer and Paul M Voyles},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2010},
  month = {Aug},
  pages = {S15--S21},
  volume = {59 Suppl 1},
  abstract = {We have used geometric optics calculations and experiments to investigate the probe-forming capability of an aberration-corrected, three-condenser scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Large, minimally convergent and coherent electron probes are useful for a variety of electron diffraction measurements. A three-condenser lens STEM can form a probe either using a virtual aperture below the sample and a virtual source on the sample plane or using a virtual aperture on the sample and a virtual source in the front focal plane. Adding a hexapole probe aberration corrector greatly increases the range of aperture demagnification and thus probe size and convergence angle. We have created probes 0.1 to approximately 12 nm in diameter in the simplest operating mode of our STEM, and we calculate that probes as large as 5000 nm that are almost perfectly parallel may be possible in more exotic lens configurations. We have also measured the spatial coherence of some of these probes.},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfq052},
  institution = {Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {dfq052},
  pmid = {20610414},
  timestamp = {2010.10.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmicro/dfq052}
}
@article{Barthel2010,
  title = {Structure of Cs0.5[Nb2.5W2.5O14] analysed by focal-series reconstruction and crystallographic image processing},
  author = {Juri Barthel and Thomas E. Weirich and Gerhard Cox and Hartmut Hibst and Andreas Thust},
  journal = {Acta Materialia},
  year = {2010},
  number = {10},
  pages = {3764 - 3772},
  volume = {58},
  doi = {10.1016/j.actamat.2010.03.016},
  issn = {1359-6454},
  keywords = {High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM)},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.09.17},
  url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6TW8-4YT5D94-1/2/e44d430faa337f4d83c6a4c152fb6f94}
}
@article{Biskupek2010,
  title = {Identification of magnetic properties of few nm sized FePt crystalline particles by characterizing the intrinsic atom order using aberration corrected S/TEM.},
  author = {Johannes Biskupek and Joerg R Jinschek and Ulf Wiedwald and Markus Bendele and Luyang Han and Paul Ziemann and Ute Kaiser},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2010},
  month = {Jun},
  number = {7},
  pages = {820--825},
  volume = {110},
  abstract = {Hard-magnetic nanomaterials like nanoparticles of FePt are of great interest because of their promising potential for data storage applications. The magnetic properties of FePt structures strongly differ whether the crystal phases are face centered cubic (fcc) or face centered tetragonal (fct). We evaluated aberration corrected HRTEM, electron diffraction and aberration corrected HAADF-STEM as methods to measure the chemical degree of order S that describes the ordering of Pt and Fe atoms within the crystals unit cells. S/TEM experiments are accompanied by image calculations. The findings are compared with results obtained from X-ray diffraction on a FePt film. Our results show that STEM is a reasonable fast approach over HRTEM and electron diffraction to locally determine the chemical degree of order S.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2010.02.043},
  institution = {Central Facility of Electron Microscopy, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm, Germany. Johannes.Biskupek@uni-ulm.de},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(10)00076-8},
  pmid = {20303666},
  timestamp = {2010.06.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2010.02.043}
}
@article{Jia2010,
  title = {On the benefit of the negative-spherical-aberration imaging technique for quantitative HRTEM.},
  author = {C. L. Jia and L. Houben and A. Thust and J. Barthel},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2010},
  month = {Apr},
  number = {5},
  pages = {500--505},
  volume = {110},
  abstract = {Employing an aberration corrector in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, the spherical aberration C(S) can be tuned to negative values, resulting in a novel imaging technique, which is called the negative C(S) imaging (NCSI) technique. The image contrast obtained with the NCSI technique is compared quantitatively with the image contrast formed with the traditional positive C(S) imaging (PCSI) technique. For the case of thin objects negative C(S) images are superior to positive C(S) images concerning the magnitude of the obtained contrast, which is due to constructive rather than destructive superposition of fundamental contrast contributions. As a consequence, the image signal obtained with a negative spherical aberration is significantly more robust against noise caused by amorphous surface layers, resulting in a measurement precision of atomic positions which is by a factor of 2-3 better at an identical noise level. The quantitative comparison of the two alternative C(S)-corrected imaging modes shows that the NCSI mode yields significantly more precise results in quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of thin objects than the traditional PCSI mode.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.10.006},
  institution = {Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Jülich, D-52425 Jülich, Germany. c.jia@fz-juelich.de},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(09)00223-X},
  pmid = {19889501},
  timestamp = {2010.06.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.10.006}
}
@article{Kotaka2010,
  title = {Essential experimental parameters for quantitative structure analysis using spherical aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM.},
  author = {Yasutoshi Kotaka},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2010},
  month = {Apr},
  number = {5},
  pages = {555--562},
  volume = {110},
  abstract = {The accuracy of quantitative analysis for Z-contrast images with a spherical aberration (C(s)) corrected high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using SrTiO(3)(001) was systematically investigated. Atomic column and background intensities were measured accurately from the experimental HAADF-STEM images obtained under exact experimental condition. We examined atomic intensity ratio dependence on experimental conditions such as defocus, convergent semi-angles, specimen thicknesses and digitalized STEM image acquisition system: brightness and contrast. In order to carry out quantitative analysis of C(s)-corrected HAADF-STEM, it is essential to determine defocus, to measure specimen thickness and to fix setting of brightness, contrast and probe current. To confirm the validity and accuracy of the experimental results, we compared experimental and HAADF-STEM calculations based on the Bloch wave method.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.12.008},
  institution = { Materials Laboratories, Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., 10-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi 243-0197, Japan.},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(09)00286-1},
  pmid = {20056326},
  timestamp = {2010.06.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.12.008}
}
@article{Lentzen2010,
  title = {Reconstruction of the projected electrostatic potential in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy including phenomenological absorption.},
  author = {M. Lentzen},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2010},
  month = {Apr},
  number = {5},
  pages = {517--526},
  volume = {110},
  abstract = {The projected electrostatic potential is reconstructed from a high-resolution exit wave function through a maximum-likelihood refinement algorithm. The theory of an already existing algorithm [1] is extended to include the effects of phenomenological absorption. Various tests with a simulated exit wave function of YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) in [100] orientation used as a source show that the reconstruction is successful, regardless of the strongly differing scattering power of atomic columns, even for the case of strong dynamical diffraction. Object thickness, the amount of absorption, and a residual defocus aberration of the wave function-parameters often unknown or difficult to measure in experiments-can be determined accurately with the aid of the refinement algorithm in a self-consistent way. For the next generation of instruments, with information limits of 0.05nm and better, reconstruction accuracies of better than 2\% can be expected, which is sufficient to measure and display the structural and chemical information with the aid of an accurate projected potential map.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.10.002},
  institution = {Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy, Research Centre Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany. m.lentzen@fz-juelich.de},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(09)00219-8},
  pmid = {19914000},
  timestamp = {2010.06.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.10.002}
}
@article{Rose2010,
  title = {Theoretical aspects of image formation in the aberration-corrected electron microscope.},
  author = {H. Rose},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2010},
  month = {Apr},
  number = {5},
  pages = {488--499},
  volume = {110},
  abstract = {The theoretical aspects of image formation in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) are outlined and revisited in detail by taking into account the elastic and inelastic scattering. In particular, the connection between the exit wave and the scattering amplitude is formulated for non-isoplanatic conditions. Different imaging modes are investigated by utilizing the scattering amplitude and employing the generalized optical theorem. A novel obstruction-free anamorphotic phase shifter is proposed which enables one to shift the phase of the scattered wave by an arbitrary amount over a large range of spatial frequencies. In the optimum case, the phase of the scattered wave and the introduced phase shift add up to -pi/2 giving negative contrast. We obtain these optimum imaging conditions by employing an aberration-corrected electron microscope operating at voltages below the knock-on threshold for atom displacement and by shifting optimally the phase of the scattered electron wave. The optimum phase shift is achieved by adjusting appropriately the constant phase shift of the phase plate and the phase shift resulting from the defocus and the spherical aberration of the corrected objective lens. The realization of this imaging mode is the aim of the SALVE project (Sub-A Low-Voltage Electron microscope).},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.10.003},
  institution = {Institute of Applied Physics, TU Darmstadt, Hochschulstrasse 6, 64289 Darmstadt, Germany. harald.rose@physik.tu-darmstadt.de},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(09)00220-4},
  pmid = {19896274},
  timestamp = {2010.06.21},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.10.003}
}
@article{Bradley2009,
  title = {Analytical SuperSTEM for extraterrestrial materials research},
  author = {John P. Bradley and Zu Rong Dai},
  journal = {Meteoritics \& Planetary Science},
  year = {2009},
  number = {10},
  pages = {1627-1642},
  volume = {44},
  doi = {10.1111/j.1945-5100.2009.tb01195.x},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.05.19}
}
@article{Erni2010151,
  title = {Optimization of exit-plane waves restored from HRTEM through-focal series},
  author = {Rolf Erni and Marta D. Rossell and Philip N.H. Nakashima},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2010},
  number = {2},
  pages = {151 - 161},
  volume = {110},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.10.015},
  issn = {0304-3991},
  keywords = {HRTEM},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.05.19},
  url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6TW1-4XKBYW6-1/2/24a369e639eaeeea98b53610f991ee15}
}
@article{M.Haider09282009,
  title = {{Current and future aberration correctors for the improvement of resolution in electron microscopy}},
  author = {Haider, M. and Hartel, P. and Müller, H. and Uhlemann, S. and Zach, J.},
  journal = {Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical,Physical and Engineering Sciences},
  year = {2009},
  number = {1903},
  pages = {3665-3682},
  volume = {367},
  abstract = {The achievable resolution of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) is mainly limited by the inherent aberrations of the objective lens. Hence, one major goal over the past decade has been the development of aberration correctors to compensate the spherical aberration. Such a correction system is now available and it is possible to improve the resolution with this corrector. When high resolution in a TEM is required, one important parameter, the field of view, also has to be considered. In addition, especially for the large cameras now available, the compensation of off-axial aberrations is also an important task. A correction system to compensate the spherical aberration and the off-axial coma is under development. The next step to follow towards ultra-high resolution will be a correction system to compensate the chromatic aberration. With such a correction system, a new area will be opened for applications for which the chromatic aberration defines the achievable resolution, even if the spherical aberration is corrected. This is the case, for example, for low-voltage electron microscopy (EM) for the investigation of beam-sensitive materials, for dynamic EM or for EM.},
  doi = {10.1098/rsta.2009.0121},
  eprint = {http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/367/1903/3665.full.pdf+html},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.05.19},
  url = {http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/367/1903/3665.abstract}
}
@article{Jia2010500,
  title = {On the benefit of the negative-spherical-aberration imaging technique for quantitative HRTEM},
  author = {C.L. Jia and L. Houben and A. Thust and J. Barthel},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2010},
  note = {Hannes Lichte 65th Birthday},
  number = {5},
  pages = {500 - 505},
  volume = {110},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.10.006},
  issn = {0304-3991},
  keywords = {Aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.05.19},
  url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6TW1-4XH5MPV-3/2/62b38c4c01dc4c805fa74f9c84820a85}
}
@article{HannesLichte09282009,
  title = {{Off-axis electron holography in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope}},
  author = {Lichte, Hannes and Geiger, Dorin and Linck, Martin},
  journal = {Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical,Physical and Engineering Sciences},
  year = {2009},
  number = {1903},
  pages = {3773-3793},
  volume = {367},
  abstract = {Electron holography allows the reconstruction of the complete electron wave, and hence offers the possibility of correcting aberrations. In fact, this was shown by means of the uncorrected CM30 Special Tübingen transmission electron microscope (TEM), revealing, after numerical aberration correction, a resolution of approximately 0.1 nm, both in amplitude and phase. However, it turned out that the results suffer from a comparably poor signal-to-noise ratio. The reason is that the limited coherent electron current, given by gun brightness, has to illuminate a width of at least four times the point-spread function given by the aberrations. As, using the hardware corrector, the point-spread function shrinks considerably, the current density increases and the signal-to-noise ratio improves correspondingly. Furthermore, the phase shift at the atomic dimensions found in the image plane also increases because the collection efficiency of the optics increases with resolution. In total, the signals of atomically fine structures are better defined for quantitative evaluation. In fact, the results achieved by electron holography in a Tecnai F20 Cs-corr TEM confirm this.},
  doi = {10.1098/rsta.2009.0126},
  eprint = {http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/367/1903/3773.full.pdf+html},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.05.19},
  url = {http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/367/1903/3773.abstract}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7336752,
  title = {Simulation Study of Aberration-Corrected High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Imaging of Few-Layer-Graphene Stacking},
  author = {Nelson,Florence and Diebold,Alain C. and Hull,Robert},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {02},
  pages = {194-199},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927609991309},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1431927609991309},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.05.19},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7336752&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S1431927609991309}
}
@article{1742-6596-209-1-012041,
  title = {Structure of an incommensurate 90° Si grain boundary resolved with the help of a Cs-corrector for illumination},
  author = {J L Rouviere and F Lançon and K Rousseau and D Caliste and P H Jouneau and F Fournel},
  journal = {Journal of Physics: Conference Series},
  year = {2010},
  number = {1},
  pages = {012041},
  volume = {209},
  abstract = {The atomic structure of an incommensurate (001)/(110) Si grain boundary (GB) or 90° Si GB has been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and refined by atomistic simulations (Stillinger-Weber potential). Samples were made by bonding one (001) Si wafer with one (110) Si wafer and carefully orienting the 2 wafers in order that they have a common [1 ##IMG## [http://ej.iop.org/icons/Entities/bar1.gif] {bar 1} 0] direction. In the interfacial direction perpendicular to [1 ##IMG## [http://ej.iop.org/icons/Entities/bar1.gif] {bar 1} 0], the [110] I direction of grain I is parallel to the [001] II direction of grain II and, as the ratio of these 2 vectors is ##IMG## [http://ej.iop.org/icons/Entities/sqrt2.gif] {sqrt2} , it is impossible to find 2 integers n and m such that n [110] I = m [001] II . The structure is incommensurate in this direction. Z -contrast images obtained in an FEI-Titan microscope equipped with a probe Cs-corrector easily resolve the Si dumb-bells in the two grains and allow us to determine the complex atomic structures of the interface. On the other hand, near on-axis high resolution TEM images obtained in a JEOL 4000EX microscope are very efficient to analyse the long range order of the interface.},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.05.19},
  url = {http://stacks.iop.org/1742-6596/209/i=1/a=012041}
}
@article{Vallet-Regi2010,
  title = {Evidence of drug confinement into silica mesoporous matrices by STEM spherical aberration corrected microscopy.},
  author = {María Vallet-Regí and Miguel Manzano and José M González-Calbet and Eiji Okunishi},
  journal = {Chem Commun (Camb)},
  year = {2010},
  month = {May},
  number = {17},
  pages = {2956--2958},
  volume = {46},
  abstract = {For the first time it has been possible to detect drug molecules confined into the inner part of pore channels of ordered mesoporous materials. This has been possible using spherical aberration correctors incorporated to a STEM microscope, which allows illuminating an individual atom with the electron beam to identify an unknown substance.},
  doi = {10.1039/c000806k},
  institution = {Departamento de Química Inorgánica y Bioinorgánica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040, Spain. vallet@farm.ucm.es},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pmid = {20386835},
  timestamp = {2010.05.19},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c000806k}
}
@article{CambridgeJournals:7336848,
  title = {The Formation and Utility of Sub-Angstrom to Nanometer-Sized Electron Probes in the Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope at the University of Illinois},
  author = {Wen,Jianguo and Mabon,James and Lei,Changhui and Burdin,Steve and Sammann,Ernie and Petrov,Ivan and Shah,Amish B. and Chobpattana,Varistha and Zhang,Jiong and Ran,Ke and Zuo,Jian-Min and Mishina,Satoshi and Aoki,Toshihiro},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2010},
  number = {02},
  pages = {183-193},
  volume = {16},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927610000085},
  eprint = {http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1431927610000085},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.05.19},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7336848&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S1431927610000085}
}
@article{J.Zach09282009,
  title = {{Chromatic correction: a revolution in electron microscopy?}},
  author = {Zach, J.},
  journal = {Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical,Physical and Engineering Sciences},
  year = {2009},
  number = {1903},
  pages = {3699-3707},
  volume = {367},
  abstract = {When the development of correctors started in the 1970s, chromatic correction was already the main goal. The first corrector that could improve the resolution of an electron microscope was a chromatic corrector for a scanning electron microscope. Within the last three decades, the development of transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) was to a large extent driven by the attempt to improve the resolution in the presence of chromatic aberration. The major technical developments were high acceleration voltages, highly excited objective lenses with short focal length and field emission guns. Meanwhile, chromatic correction has reached the TEM world. Now, the question arises as to whether chromatic correction will make some of the aforementioned developments obsolete for high-resolution TEM, thereby opening up new imaging possibilities, which are nowadays prevented by instrument constraints. We show some examples for a 0.1 nm resolution TEM with unconventional microscope designs: very low voltages, far-field objective lenses and inexpensive electron guns.},
  doi = {10.1098/rsta.2009.0125},
  eprint = {http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/367/1903/3699.full.pdf+html},
  owner = {zach},
  timestamp = {2010.05.19},
  url = {http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/367/1903/3699.abstract}
}
@article{Zhang2009,
  title = {Structural imaging of beta-Si3N4 by spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.},
  author = {Zaoli Zhang and Ute Kaiser},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2009},
  month = {Aug},
  number = {9},
  pages = {1114--1120},
  volume = {109},
  abstract = {Modern transmission electron microscopes (TEM) allow utilizing the spherical aberration coefficient as an additional free parameter for optimizing resolution and contrast. By tuning the spherical aberration coefficient of the objective lens, isolated nitrogen atom columns as well as the Si-N dumbbells within the six-membered ring were imaged in beta-Si3N4 along [0001] and [0001 ] projections with a dumbbell spacing of 0.94 A in white atom contrast. This has been obtained with negative or positive spherical aberration coefficient. We clarify contrast details in beta-Si3N4 by means of extended image calculations. A simple procedure has been shown for pure phase imaging, which is restricted to linear imaging conditions.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.04.004},
  institution = {Materials Science Electron Microscopy, Ulm University, 89069 Ulm, Germany. zhang_zaoli@yahoo.com},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {zach},
  pii = {S0304-3991(09)00104-1},
  pmid = {19493621},
  timestamp = {2010.05.19},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2009.04.004}
}
@article{pmid19687067,
  title = {{{F}uture trends in aberration-corrected electron microscopy}},
  author = {H. H. Rose},
  journal = {Philos Transact A Math Phys Eng Sci},
  year = {2009},
  month = {Sep},
  pages = {3809--3823},
  volume = {367},
  doi = {10.1098/rsta.2009.0062},
  position = {70}
}
@article{pmid19754980,
  title = {{{C}haracterizing the two- and three-dimensional resolution of an improved aberration-corrected {S}{T}{E}{M}}},
  author = {A. R. Lupini and A. Y. Borisevich and J. C. Idrobo and H. M. Christen and M. Biegalski and S. J. Pennycook},
  journal = {Microsc. Microanal.},
  year = {2009},
  month = {Oct},
  pages = {441--453},
  volume = {15},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927609990389},
  position = {69}
}
@article{pmid19339311,
  title = {{{E}volution of gold structure during thermal treatment of {A}u/{F}e{O}x catalysts revealed by aberration-corrected electron microscopy}},
  author = {L. F. Allard and A. Borisevich and W. Deng and R. Si and M. Flytzani-Stephanopoulos and S. H. Overbury},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2009},
  month = {Jun},
  pages = {199--212},
  volume = {58},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfp016},
  position = {68}
}
@article{pmid19398781,
  title = {{{F}irst application of {C}c-corrected imaging for high-resolution and energy-filtered {T}{E}{M}}},
  author = {B. Kabius and P. Hartel and M. Haider and H. M{\"u}ller and S. Uhlemann and U. Loebau and J. Zach and H. Rose},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2009},
  month = {Jun},
  pages = {147--155},
  volume = {58},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfp021 },
  position = {67}
}
@article{pmid19254915,
  title = {{{H}istorical aspects of aberration correction}},
  author = {H. H. Rose},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2009},
  month = {Jun},
  pages = {77--85},
  volume = {58},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfp012 },
  position = {66}
}
@article{KirChaHaiHet08,
  title = {Transmission electron microscopy without aberrations: Applications to materials science},
  author = {Angus Kirkland and Lan-Yun Chang and Sarah Haigh and Crispin Hetherington},
  journal = {Current Applied Physics},
  year = {2008},
  month = may,
  number = {3-4},
  pages = {425--428 },
  volume = {8},
  doi = {10.1016/j.cap.2007.10.065},
  position = {65}
}
@article{pmid19254916,
  title = {{{P}erformance and image analysis of the aberration-corrected {H}itachi {H}{D}-2700{C} {S}{T}{E}{M}}},
  author = {H. Inada and L. Wu and J. Wall and D. Su and Y. Zhu},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2009},
  month = {Jun},
  pages = {111--122},
  volume = {58},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfp011},
  position = {64}
}
@article{citeulike:3336893,
  title = {Optical depth sectioning in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission and scanning confocal electron microscope},
  author = {G. Behan and P. D. Nellist},
  journal = {Journal of Physics: Conference Series},
  year = {2008},
  number = {1},
  pages = {012083+},
  volume = {126},
  citeulike-article-id = {3336893},
  citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/126/1/012083},
  doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/126/1/012083},
  issn = {1742-6596},
  position = {63},
  posted-at = {2009-11-26 16:01:18},
  priority = {2},
  publisher = {IOP Publishing},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/126/1/012083}
}
@article{pmid18096098,
  title = {{{I}maging modes for scanning confocal electron microscopy in a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope}},
  author = {P. D. Nellist and E. C. Cosgriff and G. Behan and A. I. Kirkland},
  journal = {Microsc. Microanal.},
  year = {2008},
  month = {Feb},
  pages = {82--88},
  volume = {14},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927608080057 },
  position = {62}
}
@article{pmid18171500,
  title = {{{H}igh-resolution {T}{E}{M} and the application of direct and indirect aberration correction}},
  author = {C. J. Hetherington and L. Y. Chang and S. Haigh and P. D. Nellist and L. C. Gontard and R. E. Dunin-Borkowski and A. I. Kirkland},
  journal = {Microsc. Microanal.},
  year = {2008},
  month = {Feb},
  pages = {60--67},
  volume = {14},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927608080148},
  position = {61}
}
@article{pmid18096096,
  title = {{{E}lectron holography with a {C}s-corrected transmission electron microscope}},
  author = {D. Geiger and H. Lichte and M. Linck and M. Lehmann},
  journal = {Microsc. Microanal.},
  year = {2008},
  month = {Feb},
  pages = {68--81},
  volume = {14},
  doi = {10.1017/S143192760808001X},
  position = {60}
}
@article{pmid18456408,
  title = {{{E}ffect of a physical phase plate on contrast transfer in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope}},
  author = {B. Gamm and K. Schultheiss and D. Gerthsen and R. R. Schr{\"o}der},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2008},
  month = {Aug},
  pages = {878--884},
  volume = {108},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2008.02.009},
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}
@book{08Aberrationcorrectedmicroscopy,
  title = {Aberration-corrected microscopy},
  editor = {Peter Hawkes},
  publisher = {ACADEMIC PRESS},
  year = {2008},
  month = dec,
  series = {Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics},
  volume = {153},
  position = {58},
  url = {http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookbibliographicinfo.cws_home/716296/description\#bibliographicinfo}
}
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@article{pmid19196423,
  title = {{{A}berration-corrected microscopy for structural biology applications}},
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  volume = {233},
  doi = {10.1111/j.1365-2818.2008.03106.x},
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}
@article{citeulike:3336853,
  title = {Aberration corrected TEM: current status and future prospects},
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  journal = {Journal of Physics: Conference Series},
  year = {2008},
  number = {1},
  pages = {012034+},
  volume = {126},
  citeulike-article-id = {3336853},
  citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/126/1/012034},
  doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/126/1/012034},
  issn = {1742-6596},
  position = {55},
  posted-at = {2009-11-26 15:55:16},
  priority = {2},
  publisher = {IOP Publishing},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/126/1/012034}
}
@article{pmid18653874,
  title = {{{S}tudying atomic structures by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy}},
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  year = {2008},
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  pages = {506--510},
  volume = {321},
  doi = {10.1126/science.1152800},
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@article{pmid19308084,
  title = {{{I}s science prepared for atomic-resolution electron microscopy?}},
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  volume = {8},
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@article{pmid18793491,
  title = {{{D}etection of single atoms and buried defects in three dimensions by aberration-corrected electron microscope with 0.5-{A} information limit}},
  author = {C. Kisielowski and B. Freitag and M. Bischoff and H. {van Lin} and S. Lazar and G. Knippels and P. Tiemeijer and M. {van der Stam} and S. {von Harrach} and M. Stekelenburg and M. Haider and S. Uhlemann and H. M{\"u}ller and P. Hartel and B. Kabius and D. Miller and I. Petrov and E. A. Olson and T. Donchev and E. A. Kenik and A. R. Lupini and J. Bentley and S. J. Pennycook and I. M. Anderson and A. M. Minor and A. K. Schmid and T. Duden and V. Radmilovic and Q. M. Ramasse and M. Watanabe and R. Erni and E. A. Stach and P. Denes and U. Dahmen},
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  volume = {14},
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  position = {52}
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@article{citeulike:6219177,
  title = {Optics of high-performance electron microscopes},
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  journal = {Science and Technology of Advanced Materials},
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}
@article{pmid18035499,
  title = {{{P}rospects for analyzing the electronic properties in nanoscale systems by {V}{E}{E}{L}{S}}},
  author = {R. Erni and S. Lazar and N. D. Browning},
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  year = {2008},
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  pages = {270--276},
  volume = {108},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2007.07.008},
  position = {50}
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@article{pmid18703285,
  title = {{{L}ow-dose aberration corrected cryo-electron microscopy of organic specimens}},
  author = {J. E. Evans and C. Hetherington and A. Kirkland and L. Y. Chang and H. Stahlberg and N. Browning},
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  year = {2008},
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  volume = {108},
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@article{pmid18639381,
  title = {{{T}hree-dimensional imaging in double aberration-corrected scanning confocal electron microscopy, part {I}: elastic scattering}},
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  volume = {108},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2008.05.009},
  position = {47}
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  year = {2008},
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@article{pmid18054170,
  title = {{{S}eeing atoms with aberration-corrected sub-{A}ngstr?m electron microscopy}},
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@article{pmid18060700,
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  volume = {108},
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  position = {44}
}
@article{pmid17509765,
  title = {{{I}maging of radiation-sensitive samples in transmission electron microscopes equipped with {Z}ernike phase plates}},
  author = {M. Malac and M. Beleggia and R. Egerton and Y. Zhu},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
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  volume = {108},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2007.03.008},
  position = {43}
}
@article{variousauthors,
  title = {An entire issue of Microscopy and Microanalysis presents papers from a meeting on Materials Research in an Aberration-Free Environment. },
  author = {{various authors}},
  journal = {Microscopy and Microanalysis},
  year = {2008},
  month = feb,
  number = {01},
  volume = {14},
  position = {43},
  url = {http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayIssue?jid=MAM\&volumeId=14\&issueId=01\#}
}
@article{PubMed_17517476,
  title = {LACDIF, a new electron diffraction technique obtained with the LACBED configuration and a C(s) corrector: comparison with electron precession.},
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  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2008},
  month = jan,
  number = {2},
  pages = {100--15},
  volume = {108},
  abstract = {By combining the large-angle convergent-beam electron diffraction (LACBED) configuration together with a microscope equipped with a C(s) corrector it is possible to obtain good quality spot patterns in image mode and not in diffraction mode as it is usually the case. These patterns have two main advantages with respect to the conventional selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) or microdiffraction patterns. They display a much larger number of reflections and the diffracted intensity is the integrated intensity. These patterns have strong similarities with the electron precession patterns and they can be used for various applications like the identification of the possible space groups of a crystal from observations of the Laue zones or the ab-initio structure identifications. Since this is a defocused method, another important application concerns the analysis of electron beam-sensitive materials. Successful applications to polymers are given in the present paper to prove the validity of this method with regards to these materials.},
  affiliation = {Laboratoire de M{\'e}tallurgie Physique et G{\'e}nie des Mat{\'e}riaux, UMR CNRS 8517, USTL \& ENSCL, Cit{\'e} Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. jean-paul.morniroli@univ-lille1.fr},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2007.03.006},
  issn = {0304-3991},
  position = {42}
}
@article{pmid16872744,
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  year = {2006},
  pages = {1033--1040},
  volume = {106},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2006.04.017},
  position = {41}
}
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  posted-at = {2009-11-26 15:19:58},
  priority = {2},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0034-4885/69/3/R04}
}
@article{pmid17306928,
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  year = {2007},
  month = {Aug},
  pages = {626--634},
  volume = {107},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2006.12.004},
  position = {36}
}
@inbook{HeCoDoHuKiTi05,
  title = {Aberration-corrected HREM/STEM for semiconductor research},
  author = {C J D Hetherington and D J H Cockayne and R C Doole and J L Hutchison and A I Kirkland and J M Titchmarsh},
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  publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
  year = {2005},
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  month = {Aug},
  pages = {575--586},
  volume = {107},
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@article{pmid17207934,
  title = {{{P}rospects for aberration corrected electron precession}},
  author = {C. S. Own and W. Sinkler and L. D. Marks},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2007},
  pages = {534--542},
  volume = {107},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2006.03.011},
  position = {35}
}
@article{citeulike:6219083,
  title = {Electron nanodiffraction using sharply focused parallel probes},
  author = {Christian Dwyer and Angus I. Kirkland and Peter Hartel and Heiko M{\"u}ller and Maximilian Haider},
  journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
  year = {2007},
  number = {15},
  pages = {151104+},
  volume = {90},
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  citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://link.aip.org/link/?APL/90/151104},
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  priority = {2},
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}
@article{citeulike:624036,
  title = {Cross-sectional image obtained from spherical aberration-free three-dimensional image intensity distribution in transmission electron microscopy},
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  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2006},
  month = {January},
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  pages = {27--30},
  volume = {55},
  citeulike-article-id = {624036},
  citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmicro/dfl006},
  citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://jmicro.oxfordjournals.org/content/55/1/27.abstract},
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  day = {1},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfl006},
  issn = {0022-0744},
  position = {31},
  posted-at = {2009-11-26 15:03:57},
  priority = {2},
  publisher = {Oxford University Press},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmicro/dfl006}
}
@article{citeulike:523510,
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  year = {2006},
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  volume = {26},
  citeulike-article-id = {523510},
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  doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/26/1/002},
  issn = {1742-6596},
  position = {30},
  posted-at = {2009-11-26 15:00:42},
  priority = {2},
  publisher = {Institute of Physics Publishing},
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}
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  volume = {12},
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@article{citeulike:6074011,
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  year = {2006},
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  priority = {2},
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  volume = {12},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927606060697},
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}
@article{pmid19830941,
  title = {{{A}tomic scale analysis of planar defects in polycrystalline diamond}},
  author = {R. Erni and B. Freitag and P. Hartel and H. M{\"u}ller and P. Tiemeijer and M. {van der Stam} and M. Stekelenburg and D. Hubert and P. Specht and V. Garibay-Febles},
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  volume = {12},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927606060594},
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@article{pmid19830940,
  title = {{{E}arly results from an aberration-corrected {J}{E}{O}{L} 2200{F}{S} {S}{T}{E}{M}/{T}{E}{M} at {O}ak {R}idge {N}ational {L}aboratory}},
  author = {D. A. Blom and L. E. Allard and S. Mishina and M. A. O'Keefe},
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@article{pmid19830937,
  title = {{{L}ocal measurement and computational refinement of aberrations for {H}{R}{T}{E}{M}}},
  author = {A. I. Kirkland and R. R. Meyer and L. Y. Chang},
  journal = {Microsc. Microanal.},
  year = {2006},
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  volume = {12},
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@article{pmid19830935,
  title = {{{A}dvancing the hexapole {C}s-corrector for the scanning transmission electron microscope}},
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@article{pmid16870338,
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@article{pmid16125321,
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@article{pmid16309838,
  title = {{{O}n the importance of fifth-order spherical aberration for a fully corrected electron microscope}},
  author = {L. Y. Chang and A. I. Kirkland and J. M. Titchmarsh},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2006},
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  volume = {106},
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@article{citeulike:523471,
  title = {The application of spherical aberration correction and focal series restoration to high-resolution images of platinum nanocatalyst particles},
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  volume = {26},
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  doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/26/1/006},
  issn = {1742-6596},
  position = {19},
  posted-at = {2009-11-26 14:31:30},
  priority = {2},
  publisher = {Institute of Physics Publishing},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/26/1/006}
}
@article{citeulike:523504,
  title = {Monochromators and Aberration Correctors: Taking EELS to New Levels of Energy and Spatial Resolution},
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  position = {18},
  posted-at = {2009-11-26 14:27:40},
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@article{pmid16545524,
  title = {{{I}mage deconvolution in spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy}},
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@article{pmid17481356,
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  doi = {10.1017/S1431927606060326},
  position = {16}
}
@article{pmid17481332,
  title = {{{A}tomic structure of {B}eta-tantalum nanocrystallites}},
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  volume = {11},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927605050543},
  position = {15}
}
@article{pmid16226377,
  title = {{{A}tomic-precision determination of the reconstruction of a 90 degree tilt boundary in {Y}{B}a2{C}u3{O}7-delta by aberration corrected {H}{R}{T}{E}{M}}},
  author = {L. Houben and A. Thust and K. Urban},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2006},
  month = {Feb},
  pages = {200--214},
  volume = {106},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2005.07.009},
  position = {14}
}
@article{pmid16055270,
  title = {{{D}iagnosis of aberrations from crystalline samples in scanning transmission electron microscopy}},
  author = {Q. M. Ramasse and A. L. Bleloch},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2005},
  month = {Dec},
  pages = {37--56},
  volume = {106},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2005.06.007},
  position = {13}
}
@article{UnHoNaMaZa05,
  title = {Aberration correction and its automatic control in scanning electron microscopes},
  author = {Shinobu Uno and Kazuhiro Honda and Natsuko Nakamura and Miyuki Matsuya and Joachim Zach},
  journal = {Optik},
  year = {2005},
  month = sep,
  number = {9},
  pages = {438--448 },
  volume = {116},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ijleo.2005.03.001},
  position = {12}
}
@article{pmid16123057,
  title = {{{A} simple method for minimizing non-linear image contrast in spherical aberration-corrected {H}{R}{T}{E}{M}}},
  author = {J. Yamasaki and T. Kawai and N. Tanaka},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2005},
  month = {Jun},
  pages = {209--214},
  volume = {54},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfi029},
  position = {11}
}
@article{pmid16123071,
  title = {{{H}{R}{T}{E}{M} imaging of atoms at sub-{A}ngstr?m resolution}},
  author = {M. A. O'Keefe and L. F. Allard and D. A. Blom},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2005},
  month = {Jun},
  pages = {169--180},
  volume = {54},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfi036},
  position = {10}
}
@article{pmid15961407,
  title = {{{F}irst experiments of selected area nano-diffraction from semiconductor interfaces using a spherical aberration corrected {T}{E}{M}}},
  author = {J. Yamasaki and H. Sawada and N. Tanaka},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2005},
  month = {Apr},
  pages = {123--126},
  volume = {54},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfi028},
  position = {09}
}
@article{pmid15972729,
  title = {{{E}xperimental evaluation of a spherical aberration-corrected {T}{E}{M} and {S}{T}{E}{M}}},
  author = {H. Sawada and T. Tomita and M. Naruse and T. Honda and P. Hambridge and P. Hartel and M. Haider and C. Hetherington and R. Doole and A. Kirkland and J. Hutchison and J. Titchmarsh and D. Cockayne},
  journal = {J Electron Microsc (Tokyo)},
  year = {2005},
  month = {Apr},
  pages = {119--121},
  volume = {54},
  doi = {10.1093/jmicro/dfi001},
  position = {08}
}
@article{pmid15046789,
  title = {{{A}tomic imaging in aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy}},
  author = {J. H. Chen and H. W. Zandbergen and D. V. Dyck},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2004},
  month = {Jan},
  pages = {81--97},
  volume = {98},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2003.08.003},
  position = {07}
}
@article{pmid15306044,
  title = {{{H}igh-resolution transmission electron microscopy using negative spherical aberration}},
  author = {C. L. Jia and M. Lentzen and K. Urban},
  journal = {Microsc. Microanal.},
  year = {2004},
  month = {Apr},
  pages = {174--184},
  volume = {10},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927604040425},
  position = {06}
}
@article{pmid15306045,
  title = {{{S}pherical aberration correction in tandem with exit-plane wave function reconstruction: interlocking tools for the atomic scale imaging of lattice defects in {G}a{A}s}},
  author = {K. Tillmann and A. Thust and K. Urban},
  journal = {Microsc. Microanal.},
  year = {2004},
  month = {Apr},
  pages = {185--198},
  volume = {10},
  doi = {10.1017/S1431927604040395},
  position = {05}
}
@article{pmid15149715,
  title = {{{T}he tuning of a {Z}ernike phase plate with defocus and variable spherical aberration and its use in {H}{R}{T}{E}{M} imaging}},
  author = {M. Lentzen},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2004},
  month = {Jun},
  pages = {211--220},
  volume = {99},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2003.12.007},
  position = {04}
}
@article{pmid15639351,
  title = {{{B}reaking the spherical and chromatic aberration barrier in transmission electron microscopy}},
  author = {B. Freitag and S. Kujawa and P. M. Mul and J. Ringnalda and P. C. Tiemeijer},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2005},
  month = {Feb},
  pages = {209--214},
  volume = {102},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2004.09.013},
  position = {03}
}
@article{pmid15777595,
  title = {{{A} versatile double aberration-corrected, energy filtered {H}{R}{E}{M}/{S}{T}{E}{M} for materials science}},
  author = {J. L. Hutchison and J. M. Titchmarsh and D. J. Cockayne and R. C. Doole and C. J. Hetherington and A. I. Kirkland and H. Sawada},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2005},
  month = {Apr},
  pages = {7--15},
  volume = {103},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2004.11.010},
  position = {02}
}
@article{pmid15777594,
  title = {{{P}rospects for aberration-free electron microscopy}},
  author = {H. Rose},
  journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
  year = {2005},
  month = {Apr},
  pages = {1--6},
  volume = {103},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2004.11.017},
  position = {01}
}
@article{Müller201120,
  title = {Aplanatic imaging systems for the transmission electron microscope},
  author = {Heiko Müller and Ingo Maßmann and Stephan Uhlemann and Peter Hartel and Joachim Zach and Maximilian Haider},
  journal = {Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment},
  year = {2011},
  note = {The Eighth International Conference on Charged Particle Optics},
  number = {1},
  pages = {20 - 27},
  volume = {645},
  abstract = {During the last decade aberration correctors have become a well-accepted tool in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The available correctors compensate for the spherical aberration Cs of the imaging system. Recently, for instruments with considerably improved information limit also the off-axial aberrations have attracted more attention since these aberrations limit the high-resolution field of view. We have proposed a novel hexapole-type Cs/B3-corrector which corrects for the spherical aberration and the off-axial coma of the imaging system. We discuss the assessment and correction of off-axial aberrations and report about the optical performance of the first prototype instrument.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.nima.2010.12.091},
  issn = {0168-9002},
  keywords = {Transmission electron microscope},
  url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168900210028718}
}
@article{PhysRevLett.104.200801,
  title = {Nanoscale Energy-Filtered Scanning Confocal Electron Microscopy Using a Double-Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope},
  author = {Wang, Peng and Behan, Gavin and Takeguchi, Masaki and Hashimoto, Ayako and Mitsuishi, Kazutaka and Shimojo, Masayuki and Kirkland, Angus I. and Nellist, Peter D.},
  journal = {Phys. Rev. Lett.},
  year = {2010},
  month = {May},
  number = {20},
  pages = {200801},
  volume = {104},
  doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.200801},
  numpages = {4},
  publisher = {American Physical Society}
}

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